wildlife

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program in eastern Arizona and New Mexico has long been hindered by illegal killings of the endangered animals. A recent study concluded it’s as big a factor in the population’s recovery as genetic diversity and health. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


Melissa Sevigny

Snowflake is a small town in eastern Arizona. It’s got more deer and elk than people, and that can make it dangerous to navigate rural roads at night. That’s why students at Snowflake Junior High invented a system of flashing lights to warn drivers when a big animal is nearby. It’s an idea that will take them all the way to a national competition in New York.


Coronado National Forest

It turns out that some types of wildlife like to go over a state highway, others tend to go under it and still others can go either way.

Earth Notes: Endangered Razorback Suckers

Mar 15, 2017
Travis Francis

With humped back and small eyes, the razorback sucker is an odd-looking fish. Native to the Colorado River basin but now endangered, it’s been found recently in an unexpected place, the large artificial reservoir of Lake Powell.  

Anguskirk

Here’s a surprising fact: the biggest human-caused threat to birds after habitat loss is window glass. Some estimates suggest up to one billion birds across the United States die each year after flying into glass surfaces. That’s roughly five percent of all birds.


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