native americans

New Mexico History Museum

In 1846, U.S. soldiers swept down the Santa Fe trail to seize the province of New Mexico for the United States. Santa Fe was then part of Mexico, and for a time during this war soldiers camped in the roomy courtyard at the city’s Palace of the Governors. One soldier wrote an evocative description that includes mention of baking ovens there.


AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin

Bold. Visionary. A spectacular success.

The words in an online promotion for a new museum exhibit in Washington, D.C., describe an 1830 U.S. law that forced thousands of American Indians from their lands in the South to areas west of the Mississippi River.

Ryan Heinsius

Women’s Marches were held in cities all over the world this weekend. It was the second gathering largely protesting the presidency of Donald Trump. In Flagstaff, more than a thousand people took to the streets to speak out on a wide variety of issues from gender and racial equality to preserving public lands. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


Courtesy of the John Running Collection, Cline Library, Northern Arizona University

World-renowned Flagstaff photographer John Running has died at age 78. Throughout his five-decade career he captured lavish images of the Colorado Plateau and intimate portraits of its people. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius has more. 


Ryan Williams/Navajo-Hopi Observer

The Navajo Nation has broken ground on three dozen modular homes in an area where development has been off limits for decades. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s an effort by tribal officials to revive the economy on more than 1.5 million acres known as the Former Bennett Freeze.


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