AP Photo/The Arizona Republic, Michael Chow

A new Department of Veterans Affairs Inspector General report says veterans still are dying while awaiting care at the Phoenix VA Health Care System.

The Arizona Department of Economic Security says it has good news for many low-income families looking to receive child care for their children.

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University of Arizona researchers are working on a new initial treatment for venomous snakebites.

The College of Medicine says the product now awaiting a lengthy testing process would delay or prevent some of the most serious consequences of bites from rattlesnakes and other venomous snakes.

According to Dr. Vance Nielsen, the product could be stocked in ambulances or included in first-aid kids so that it'd be available when bite victims are far from medical care.

Arizona's attorney general, Mark Brnovich, won't enforce a disputed section of a new law requiring abortion providers to tell women they can reverse drug-induced abortions until the matter can be sorted in court.

The decision made public Tuesday comes as the state prepares to defend itself in a lawsuit filed by abortion providers.

Critics have said there's no science that shows drug-induced abortions can be reversed, and abortion providers argue it's unconstitutional to require doctors to say something that goes against their medical judgment.

Unable to block Medicaid expansion, Republican legislators are now trying a different approach. They want to impose new restrictions on who can get care, and for how long. Arizona Public Radio’s Howard Fischer explains.