Charlie Leight/The Arizona Republic

The Antiquities Act gives the President of the United States power to declare national monuments. A bill sponsored by Republican Arizona Congressman Paul Gosar wants to limit that presidential authority, which has been in place for more than 100 years. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Melissa Sevigny

Nuclear power has gained more attention as a clean energy source. The raw material needed to make that power is uranium; and the highest-grade uranium deposits in the nation are near the Grand Canyon. The federal government has halted new uranium mining in the region, but old mines can still reopen.

Blake McCord/Courtesy of the Grand Canyon Trust

Arizona Congressman Raul Grijalva plans to introduce a bill that would establish a Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument. At a press conference yesterday, he was joined by tribal leaders who say it would protect cultural resources and outlaw uranium mining in the area. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 

Healing More Than Her Tribe

Feb 4, 2013

The Havasupai Tribe in Northern Arizona has had to fight to hold onto its land in the Grand Canyon. And now tribal members are struggling to maintain their culture, too. Eight miles down into Havasu Canyon lives a medicine woman who is on a mission to save it.

Claudine LoMonaco

Larry Stevens is an evolutionary biologist. For the last 41 years, he’s dedicated much of his life to the study and salvation of springs, little spots where water bubbles out of the earth.

Stevens stands in huge alcove carved out of a sandstone cliff on a remoter trail in Grand Canyon National Park. He holds a measuring cup under a stream of water that drips from a cluster of bright green ferns.

“Dripping Springs is a fairly small spring,” Stevens says. “We’re looking at half a gallon a minute of flow.”