grand canyon

Ruth Tomlinson / Robert Harding Picture Library /Aurora Photos

The Grand Canyon wants to change the way backcountry areas are managed as more outdoor enthusiasts take to the park's open spaces, with proposals that would require hikers using the most popular inner-canyon trails to spend a few dollars on a permit.

 

Millions of people visit the Grand Canyon each year, taking in the sweeping views from developed areas where they can stroll along the rim, grab a bite to eat and hop on a shuttle bus to other outlooks. Far fewer people venture into the 1.1 million acres that make up the backcountry, including trails below the canyon rim.

Melissa Sevigny

Nuclear power has gained more attention as a clean energy source. The raw material needed to make that power is uranium; and the highest-grade uranium deposits in the nation are near the Grand Canyon. The federal government has halted new uranium mining in the region, but old mines can still reopen.

Blake McCord/Courtesy of the Grand Canyon Trust

Arizona Congressman Raul Grijalva plans to introduce a bill that would establish a Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument. At a press conference yesterday, he was joined by tribal leaders who say it would protect cultural resources and outlaw uranium mining in the area. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


Chris Parish/Peregrine Fund

Saturday is National Public Lands Day. To mark the occasion, biologists at Vermillion Cliffs National Monument near Lees Ferry will release three endangered California condors into the wild. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s the 20th year the giant birds have been released in the area. 


Arizona Republic

A recent study by the U.S. Geological survey has found high levels of Mercury and Selenium in fish and other food sources along the Colorado River in Glen Canyon and Grand Canyon National Park. Arizona Public Radio’s Justin Regan reports.

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