EPA

EPA/Reuters

The U.S. Interior Department will lead a review of the Colorado mine spill that tainted rivers in three western states.

AP/Matt York

Arizona environmental officials say they don’t expect the Gold King Mine spill to have any negative impacts to the state’s watershed. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, they say Lake Powell will likely disperse the waste made up of several heavy metals.

Jerry McBride/Durango Herald

The toxic plume from the Gold King Mine spill in Colorado last week is no longer visible as it’s mixed with the murky San Juan River. Officials say it’s uncertain whether the polluted water has reached Lake Powell. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Donovan Quintero/Navajo Times

The 3 million gallons of mining waste that spilled into Colorado’s Animas River is now flowing into the San Juan River on the Navajo Nation. Tribal officials have declared a state of emergency and are preparing to sue the Environmental Protection Agency. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 

Office of Emergency Management in La Plata County Colorado

A massive wastewater spill from a Colorado mine is expected to reach Lake Powell sometime this week.

About three million gallons of wastewater poured into the Animas River last Wednesday after a breach at a defunct gold mine near Silverton. The contaminated water has reached the San Juan River in New Mexico, which flows into Lake Powell on the Colorado River. 

Cynthia Sequanna is a spokesperson for the National Park Service.

  Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich is joining with 15 other states in an effort to block new Obama Administration rules for carbon dioxide emissions from power plants.

Brnovich on Wednesday joined in a request for a stay of the rules announced by the Environmental Protection Agency on Monday pending the outcome of a planned lawsuit.

He says the EPA doesn't have the legal authority to issue the new rules.

The rules require Arizona to cut output of the heat-trapping gas blamed for global warming by 32 percent by 2030.

Myrabella

Some environmental and public-health groups are applauding President Obama’s Clean Power Plan designed to cut carbon dioxide emissions from U-S power plants. But some Arizona politicians say it’ll have a negative economic impact on the state. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

APS

State officials are sifting through public comments on a proposal that would stop coal from being used to run the Cholla Power Plant near Joseph City. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, conservation groups say the plan doesn’t go far enough to protect the environment.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has created a new online tool that identifies communities facing environmental health risks. Parts of northern Arizona are among the nation’s most vulnerable regions.

USGS

The Environmental Protection Agency is considering an update to the federal Clean Water Act. But, as Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, an Arizona congressman is trying to prevent that change from going into effect.

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