environment

Grand Canyon National Park

Researchers say Americans are willing to pay more on their taxes to restore springs in Grand Canyon National Park—even when they’ve never visited the famous landmark.


Mark Henle/The Arizona Republic

Communities on the Navajo and Hopi Nations are bracing for what they say will be devastating economic fallout after the owners of a coal-fired power plant in Arizona decided to close the location.

George Andrejko, AGFD

If you’re by a desert spring in far northwest Arizona or southeast Nevada and hear a low chuckle followed by what sounds like fingers rubbing on a balloon, you may have stumbled upon a relict leopard frog.


Scott Thybony

If you’ve done any exploring around the Southwest, you’ve probably visited a few places with rather ominous names: “Bloody Basin,” “Skull Valley,” “The Superstition Mountains.” Seems Arizona is full of places named after grim legends. “Deadman Flat” is no exception. It’s a place writer Scott Thybony has visited many times. In his latest Canyon Commentary, Thybony tells the tale of how “Deadman Flat” got its name. 


Arren Kimbel-Sannit/Cronkite News

The president of the Navajo Nation testified this week before the Senate Indian Affairs Committee about the Gold King Mine spill. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, President Russell Begaye told lawmakers federal agencies failed to help the tribe after the 2015 disaster. 


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