environment

NPS

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the fourth installment of the series, we look at northern Arizona's Pipe Spring National Monument and its rich human history.

To many Colorado Plateau tourists, Pipe Spring National Monument is about as far from civilization as it gets—a 40-acre flyspeck tucked onto the vast Arizona Strip between the North Rim of Grand Canyon and the colorful canyon parks of southern Utah.


Kristen Honig/ Valles Caldera Trust

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the third installment of the series, we look at the Valles Caldera National Preserve and its ecological recovery from two massive wildfires.

 

New Mexico’s Valles Caldera National Preserve is one of the nation’s newest national parks. It is also a living laboratory.

Alexander Gardner, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University, 1868

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the first installment of the series, we hear about efforts to protect sandstone panels of petroglyphs and pictographs at El Morro National Monument in New Mexico.

In west-central New Mexico, a huge sandstone monolith looms above a perennial pool of fresh water that’s sustained thirsty travelers for centuries.


The West’s pioneer spirit characterizes not only many of the region’s people, but also some of its plants. And a trio of pioneer species collectively called fire mosses, known on every continent, may prove an excellent tool for repairing burned-over lands on the Colorado Plateau.


Melissa Sevigny

Ponderosa pine seedlings are more likely to sprout and thrive in mechanically thinned forests, a new study out of Flagstaff finds.


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