elections

Jacob Stanek/Daily News-Sun

A court challenge prompted by major problems in Arizona's presidential primary heads to a full hearing with testimony expected from experts and voters who allege they couldn't cast ballots.

Monday's hearing in Maricopa County Superior Court comes as Judge David Gass considers a request from the Arizona attorney general's office to throw out the case.

NBC News

A unanimous Supreme Court says an Arizona commission did not violate the principle of one person, one vote when it redrew the state's legislative districts in a way that created some with more residents than others and improved the prospects for Democrats.

 

The justices on Wednesday rejected a challenge from a group of Republican voters who claimed the state's Independent Redistricting Commission illegally packed GOP voters into some districts while leaving other Democratic-leaning districts with smaller populations.

Miguel Otarola/Cronkite News

The Arizona Senate has amended an unrelated election bill to require Maricopa County to at least triple the number of polling places from the number it had in the March 22 presidential primary election.

Maricopa County saw huge lines at many of its presidential primary polling places after it cut the number to 60 from 200 in 2012.

Sen. Kimberly Yee says she worked with the county recorder and Secretary of State to craft the language of the amendment adopted Monday. The underlying bill, House Bill 2017, deals with campaign signs and awaits a formal vote.

A Utah county is crying foul over a lawsuit filed by members of the Navajo Nation who say a move to hold elections only by mail disenfranchises people who live on remote parts of the reservation where mail service is unreliable.

San Juan County countered in a recent court filing that the Navajos fabricated the claim in an attempt to control local politics.

The county said voter participation actually increased in 2014, in part because the mail-in voting allowed Navajos who work out of town or go away to college or the military to cast ballots.

The Atlantic

The Democratic National Committee, the Arizona Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton's campaign are expanding their challenge over voting rights to Arizona in the wake of its troubled presidential primary.

 

Clinton has made voter suppression and ballot laws in Republican-led states a centerpiece of her campaign as she rallies her base in the 2016 White House race.

Her campaign and Democrats plan to file a lawsuit aiming to force changes in how the state runs its elections.

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