economy

Melissa Sevigny

Yesterday we heard about northern Arizona’s tree thinning projects and who makes the decision on which trees to cut. In part 2 of that story, what happens to those trees afterward? Flagstaff has always been a logging town, but things have changed. When the U.S. Forest Service began to thin the woods almost a decade ago reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires, some thought it would bring a second economic boom for the logging industry. As KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that heyday hasn’t happened.

Arizona Governor Doug Ducey vows to keep Grand Canyon National Park open in the event of a federal government shutdown. KNAU's Justin Regan reports.


Ryan Heinsius

If you’re one of the many people dragging your feet to take down your holiday lights, here’s a little advice from 97-year-old Ethel Thomas, the grandmother of KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius:

“There’s nothing as over as Christmas.”

And that’s why a growing number of professionals have found a lucrative niche putting up and taking down lights and decorations. While you might not have the time and energy to do it, they certainly do for the right price. Ryan has this report. 


David Wallace/The Arizona Republic

A resolution passed this week by the Flagstaff City Council means local leaders won’t invest with any company or contractor associated with President Trump’s proposed border wall. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Arizona's unemployment rate has dropped to the lowest level since November 2007, falling to 4.5 percent from 4.3 percent last month.

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