Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Francis Smiley

Skilled nomadic hunters in North America developed "high-tech" weaponry early on. They made a unique new projectile point style to attach to spears and throwing sticks about 13,500 years ago. 

Earth Notes: Sandstone Bees

Oct 25, 2017
Michael Orr

The Colorado Plateau’s harsh environment is a fitting home for a wild bee so tough it chews nest holes into solid rock. These rare sandstone-nesting bees, recently named Anthophora pueblo, are active for only a short time each spring, avoiding blazing summer heat.


Earth Notes: Potter Wasps

Oct 18, 2017
Gary Alpert

Native Americans in the Southwest are renowned for their beautiful ceramics. And it just could be they were inspired by watching a local insect build a nest of clay.


Ka-Voka Jackson

Ka-Voka Jackson’s college career began with a science scholarship from the Hualapai Tribe.  Now she’s a master’s student in restoration ecology at the University of Nevada Las Vegas.


Earth Notes: Clark’s Nutcracker

Oct 4, 2017
Eugene Beckes

Explorers Lewis and Clark, in Idaho in the early 1800s, observed dapper grey and black birds ripping into pine cones for the seeds. William Clark mistook them for woodpeckers, but Meriwether Lewis correctly identified the species as a cousin of crows, ravens, and jays. Still, ornithologists named the bird Clark's nutcracker. 


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