Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Earth Notes: Fireflies in Flagstaff

Jul 12, 2017
Jason Wilder

Jason Wilder was out looking for owls around Mount Elden one evening in June 2014. The Flagstaff biology professor noticed a tiny green light glowing on the forest floor, and in a careful search he found the light was coming from a flightless female firefly.


Earth Notes: Bear Aware

Jul 5, 2017
Colorado Parks & Wildlife

Every summer as people head outdoors, headlines inevitably tell of encounters and conflicts between humans and bears.  Colorado Parks and Wildlife’s Bear Aware program aims to educate people on coexisting with black bears, and helping keep the animals wild. The program now has more than 220 volunteers, and a website that offers many useful resources. 

NOAA

The National Weather Service operates a widely spaced Doppler radar network across our region—from Blue Ridge Reservoir south of Flagstaff to Albuquerque, Las Vegas, and Grand Junction, Colorado. 


Michael Collier

Next time you pass a mature ponderosa pine, notice its broad plates of orange-red bark etched with black crevices. That thick, puzzle-shaped bark helps the tree survive moderate forest fires by protecting the inside of the trunk from overheating; severe fires though can kill even the thickest-barked trees.


Earth Notes: Edgar Alexander Mearns

Jun 14, 2017
Smithsonian Institution Archives

On a cloudy, windy day in June 1887, Edgar Mearns climbed Mount Humphreys, Arizona's highest peak. Taking shelter behind a pile of stones, he was joined by a broad-tailed hummingbird—a fitting companion for one of America's greatest ornithologists.


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