Earth Notes

The Colorado Plateau is one of North America’s human and environmental treasures. Ancient cultures have called this land of sun-baked deserts and lush mountain landscapes home for centuries. Earth Notes, KNAU’s weekly environmental series, explores the Plateau by telling stories of the intricate relationships between environmental issues and our daily lives.

Rooted in science and wrapped in human interest, the two minute long segments encourage listeners to think of themselves as part of the solution to environmental problems. Upbeat and informative, the program tries to foster hope and dampen despair about the environment, and motivate listeners to become more conscious and informed stewards of the Colorado Plateau.

Rose Houk

The ancestors of northern Arizona's elk were brought here from Wyoming more than a century ago. This spring, a group of those elk took another journey, to West Virginia.


Earth Notes: The Audubon National Parks Bird Report

May 16, 2018
Camilla Cerea/Audubon

The azure western bluebird and noisy red-breasted nuthatch are among the most common and beloved birds on the Colorado Plateau. But, will they and others still live here as the Southwest’s climate warms and dries? Our national parks may be a deciding factor.


Earth Notes: Year of the Bird

May 9, 2018
Bill Blaker

A hundred years ago, migratory birds suddenly became much safer, thanks to the outrage of two Victorian-era Boston women. Their efforts led to passage of landmark legislation, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. To mark the centennial of that important law, 2018 has been declared Year of the Bird.


Diane Hope/@audioninjachick

Doppler radar is a crucial tool for spotting severe weather, but it doesn’t tell the whole story. When a thunderstorm is far away, the radar can typically only see the upper portions of it.  


Northern Arizona University

One-quarter of all mammal species are bats—and they’re a prominent feature of night skies across North America. But a devastating disease has swept westward across the country since 2006, causing bat numbers to decline drastically.


Pages