colorado river

Alan English CPA

 Government scientists have gathered data to answer the question of whether a new uranium mining operation will contaminate the Grand Canyon region.

Scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey spent two years collecting and analyzing soil samples from around the Canyon Mine near Tusayan. The study gives them a baseline of the environment they can use to compare with future soil samples.

The mine on U.S. Forest Service land was approved in the 1980s, but ore never was pulled from the ground.

Researchers say environmental protection for the 1,450-mile-long Colorado River is disjointed and too often gets a low priority.

A new critique from the Colorado River Research Group says four multimillion-dollar conservation programs do valuable work but would have more impact if they treated the entire river as a single, integrated system instead of operating separately.

  

The research group is an independent organization of academics with expertise in water, agriculture, law and other fields.

  

AP Photo/Brian Witte

The National Park Service has outlined a series of actions in response to a federal report that found employees at the Grand Canyon preyed on their female colleagues and retaliated against them for refusing sexual advances.

The agency's Intermountain Region director, Sue Masica, said employees will be disciplined appropriately and she will push a message of zero tolerance for sexual harassment and hostile work environments.

grandcanyonescalade.com

The Grand Canyon will get a lot of attention Saturday night in Flagstaff, as the city’s Mountain Film Festival hosts a special event called, “Celebration of the Grand.” There will be several presentations and films that focus on the canyon, including one called “Keep It Grand.” The short film explores the wide-ranging impacts of the proposed and controversial Escalade Project. Dan Ferrara is a New York-based filmmaker who wrote and directed the film, and spoke to KNAU's Aaron Granillo.


(Courtesy of Pamela Wolfson via AP)

A Denver man has logged the fastest Grand Canyon river trip on record, battling blisters and rapids as he paddled his kayak down a 277-mile stretch of the Colorado River in 34 hours and two minutes.

Ben Orkin reached the end of his journey Sunday, exhausted after navigating the water in the dark and swimming part of it when a rapid toppled his kayak. Orkin beat a record set last week by more than an hour and a previous one set by three men in a non-motorized boat in 1983, according to Tom Martin, secretary of the Grand Canyon Historical Society.

Pages