Morning Edition

Weekdays on News and Talk and News and Classical 5:00 a.m to 9:00 a.m

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
5182a054e1c801268257cd91|5182a050e1c801268257cd81

Pages

Africa
2:00 am
Thu January 19, 2012

Egypt's Military Government Quiets Revolutionaries

Originally published on Thu January 19, 2012 8:36 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

A year has passed since the revolution in Egypt began. Suddenly young people there, like this protestor in Cairo's Tahrir Square, could envision a different future for Egypt.

SAKHI SAHER: So now we're going to witness a new country with new order, with new politeness amongst the people, and no one throwing garbage in the streets. It's going to be a new start, a new beginning.

Read more
Business
2:00 am
Thu January 19, 2012

The Last Word In Business

When the Washington Monument was damaged after an earthquake last summer, Congress committed $7.5 million to fix it but expected the public to pay the other $7.5 million. It turns out the public will be just one person. The Washington Post reports billionaire David Rubenstein will make the $7.5 million donation Thursday.

Opinion
10:01 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

Love On Hold: For Army Wife, Missed Connections

Siobhan Fallon welcomes home her husband from deployment with her daughter, Maeve, in 2009.
Courtesy of Siobhan Fallon

Siobhan Fallon is the author of the short-story collection You Know When the Men Are Gone.

The spouses of deployed soldiers have a desperate relationship with the phone.

Read more
Music Interviews
10:01 pm
Wed January 18, 2012

The Pre-Game Songs That Send Matt Barnes Soaring

Matt Barnes goes up for the dunk at a January game against the Utah Jazz.
Melissa Majchrzak NBAE/Getty Images

Language Advisory: The songs linked to in this article contain lyrics that some listeners may find offensive.

As many people head back to the gym this month, we're doing our part to help with The Ultimate NPR Workout Mix.

We're asking people what songs make them move, and it turns out music is just as important for motivating professional athletes as it is for the rest of us. We caught up with Los Angeles Lakers forward Matt Barnes after a recent practice --he says that before games, it's all about one rapper.

Read more
Around the Nation
5:38 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Handcuffed Man Accused Of Stealing Police Car

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Around the Nation
5:28 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Southern California City Fights Crime With Tweets

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 5:30 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. A city here in Southern California is fighting crime with tweets - not social networking, real tweets by birds playing on speakers along the city's main drag. The Wall Street Journal posted online the soundscape - chirping robins, splashing water and faint musical notes. The mayor of Lancaster tells the Journal the birds put residents in, quote, "a better place." And though police say the causes are many, crime in the city is down. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Asia
2:00 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Ambassador Locke Shares His Impressions Of China

Gary Locke is Washington's ambassador to Beijing. He took over the post after Jon Huntsman left. Locke is the first U.S. ambassador to China to have roots in that country — his ancestors hail from a village in southern China. He serves at a time of enormous change, a time when many Americans see China as a threat. Ambassador Locke talks to Steve Inskeep about his impressions of China and its government.

Around the Nation
2:00 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Calif. Gov. Brown's Speech To Outline More Cuts

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 3:36 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The economy may be improving but state governments are still working to repair the damage to their books. We're keeping track with a series of reports, and we go this morning to the nation's most populous state, which has some of the nation's largest problems.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Here in California today, Governor Jerry Brown gives the State of the State address. He'll outline more cuts to government programs while asking voters to approve a measure to raise taxes. Here's NPR's Richard Gonzales.

Read more
Afghanistan
2:00 am
Wed January 18, 2012

Exploring Peace Talks With The Taliban

Originally published on Wed January 18, 2012 4:44 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

Read more
Business
2:00 am
Wed January 18, 2012

China Advertises Red Pad Which Looks Like An iPad

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Today's last word in business comes from China, and the word is: Red Pad.

It's a device that looks a lot like an iPad, except it's red in color and in ideological purity.

The Wall Street Journal picked up on the device, which was advertised briefly in China's state media. It offered Web content for the party faithful, like quick access to the Communist Party's mouthpiece, the People's Daily. The device however, was apparently priced at more than $1,500 - good deal more than an iPad.

Read more

Pages