Morning Edition

Weekdays on News and Talk and News and Classical 5:00 a.m to 9:00 a.m

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Animals
5:06 am
Mon January 30, 2012

Doberman In 'Hugo' Snubbed For Dog Movie Award

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 5:11 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. Martin Scorsese got 11 Oscar nods for his film "Hugo." Still, he's calling in the L.A. Times a write-in campaign for an actor he feels has been snubbed. Blackie, the Doberman in "Hugo," failed to get a nomination for a Golden Collar, awarded by Dog News Daily. The cute Jack Russell who starred in "The Artist" was nominated, but Blackie is an anti-hero. And just a few hundred Facebook votes will earn him a chance at top dog. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Business
2:00 am
Mon January 30, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 4:51 am

At the end of last week, an employee sent an email with a simple request: Please bring me a copy of the new directory. She accidentally copied every member of the legislature and all of their staff. The email went to some 4,000 people. Recipients then started to reply-all with many messages, and the system couldn't handle it.

Analysis
2:00 am
Mon January 30, 2012

Politics In The News

The Republican Party holds its fourth presidential nominating contest tomorrow in Florida. Renee Montagne talks to NPR News Analyst Cokie Roberts about the week in politics.

Business
2:00 am
Mon January 30, 2012

The Waiting May Be Almost Over For Facebook IPO

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 4:32 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with Facebook getting ready.

Business
2:00 am
Mon January 30, 2012

UPS Driver Honored For Accident-Free Career

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 3:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's come closer to home now for the story of a man who's a model of consistency. UPS, the shipping company, has honored one of its drivers. The company says Ron Sowder has driven delivery trucks and tractor trailers at UPS for 50 years without being blamed for an accident. He has managed to stay safe while climbing into the cab more than 12,000 times and traveling more than four million miles.

Lately, he's been driving across Ohio, to Cincinnati and then to Louisville, Kentucky.

How'd you get into this line of work?

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Author Interviews
10:01 pm
Sun January 29, 2012

'Consent' Asks: Who Owns The Internet?

Rebecca MacKinnon is a Bernard Schwartz Senior Fellow at the New America Foundation. She lives in Washington, D.C.
Brooke Bready

Originally published on Mon January 30, 2012 11:29 am

While the Internet may aid the spread of democracy, democracy doesn't necessarily mean a free and open Internet. In her new book Consent of the Networked: The Worldwide Struggle for Internet Freedom, Rebecca MacKinnon, senior fellow at the New America Foundation and co-founder of Global Voices, a citizen media network, investigates the corrosion of civil liberties by the governments and corporations that control the digital world.

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The Two-Way
5:14 am
Fri January 27, 2012

Women's Car-Shopping Tactics Steer Them Toward Better Deals

A new survey from LeaseTrader finds that women ask more thorough questions than men when buying cars.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri January 27, 2012 8:44 am

When it comes to buying cars, women do their homework — and it pays off. A recent report from LeaseTrader.com finds women generally get better deals than men when they buy cars.

John Sternal of LeaseTrader tells NPR's Sonari Glinton on Morning Edition that women's participation in car buying is changing.

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Around the Nation
4:42 am
Fri January 27, 2012

Army Base Isn't Laughing At Package Bomb Comment

Originally published on Fri January 27, 2012 8:04 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Europe
4:29 am
Fri January 27, 2012

Politician 'Borrows' From Aaron Sorkin Movie

The transport minister in Australia denounced a political opponent. He said the opponent wasn't interested in fixing a problem, only in making people "afraid of it" and telling them "who's to blame for it." Critics note Michael Douglas used that line in Aaron Sorkin's movie The American President.

Middle East
2:23 am
Fri January 27, 2012

Authorities Bars 6 Americans From Leaving Egypt

Egyptian authorities are preventing six Americans, including the son of Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, from leaving the country. They work for non-governmental agencies that were raided by Egyptian security forces last month.

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