Morning Edition

Weekdays on News and Talk and News and Classical 5:00 a.m to 9:00 a.m

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with two hours of multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA. Even as hosts, Inskeep and Montagne often get out from behind the anchor desk and travel across the world to report on the news first hand.

Heard regularly on Morning Edition are some of the most familiar voices including news analyst Cokie Roberts and sport commentator Frank Deford as well as the special series StoryCorps, which travels the country recording America's oral history.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Since its debut on November 5, 1979, Morning Edition has garnered broadcasting's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award and the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award.

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Business
2:09 am
Thu June 28, 2012

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And you may want to Google our last word in business today. That word is foie-kage. It's kind of like corkage, the fee restaurants charge to open a bottle of wine that you've brought in with you.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Foie-kage is the fee that Californians will have to pay if they want to eat foie gras - fatty goose or duck liver. They'll have to bring their own because starting thanks week, restaurants will be banned from serving the delicacy.

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Europe
2:09 am
Thu June 28, 2012

European Leaders Grapple With Saving Euro

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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Business
2:09 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Google Is The Latest To Get Into Computer Tablets

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Google opened its World Wide Developers conference yesterday with a few announcements — the most notable is its entry into the highly competitive tablet market.

LAURA SYDELL, BYLINE: As NPR's Laura Sydell reports, with the Nexus 7, Google is headed for a market somewhere between the Amazon Fire and Apple's iPad.

It's called the Nexus 7 because it's a seven-inch tablet. Google also announced more content for its online store. In addition to music, movies and books, they will have TV shows and magazines.

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Music
12:26 am
Thu June 28, 2012

The Bajo Quinto: The Instrument That Will Not Go Gently

Don Telesforo next to a bajo quinto, holding a jarana mixteca.
Courtesy of Ruben Luengas

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

Almost 20 years ago, a young student at the National University of Mexico went in search of a very old instrument in the mountains of the southern state of Oaxaca. Today, he has become a leading force in the revival of the instrument called the bajo quinto and the music played on it.

Ruben Luengas was working on a research project at the National School of Music in Mexico City in 1995. He wanted to focus on the music of his hometown, in the Mixtec region of Oaxaca, so he asked his 97-year-old grandmother to tell him about the music played at her wedding.

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The Salt
12:25 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Unlike Chicken And Pork, Beef Still Begins With Small Family Ranches

Barbara and Norman Roux stand in front of cattle pens on their farm outside of Moundridge, Kan., where she has raised cattle for nearly 70 years.
Peggy Lowe Harvest Public Media

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 4:47 pm

In the chicken and pork industries, nearly every aspect of the animals' raising has long been controlled by just a handful of agriculture conglomerates. But the cattle industry is still populated by mom-and-pop operations, at least at the calf-raising level.

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Asia
12:17 am
Thu June 28, 2012

Amid Fierce Debate, Japan To Restart Nuclear Plants

Anti-nuclear activists in front of the prime minister's official residence in Tokyo, June 22. Some 20,000 demonstrators protested against the Japanese government's decision to restart two idle nuclear reactors in western Japan, ending a brief period without any nuclear power generation.
Rie Ishii AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

After taking all 50 of its nuclear reactors offline following a devastating accident last year, Japan is planning to restart the first of two of them in western Fukui prefecture as early as Sunday.

The catastrophe at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant in March 2011 forced Japan to scale back plans to aggressively expand its nuclear energy sector. But the highly controversial move to restart the two reactors on the other side of the country is a sign that the nuclear power lobby isn't throwing in the towel yet.

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American Dreams: Then And Now
9:03 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

Great Expectations, And Some Hope Of Meeting Them

In plays like FOB, M. Butterfly and Chinglish, David Henry Hwang, seen here at a 2006 gala, touches on the obstacles that can stand between immigrants and the American dream.
Amy Sussman Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

David Henry Hwang is a playwright from Los Angeles, currently living in New York, who has dealt with issues of cultural identity in his work, especially as it pertains to the Asian-American experience. He spoke to NPR's Morning Edition about his thoughts on the American dream.

"I define the American dream as the ability to imagine a way that you want your life to turn out, and have a reasonable hope that you can achieve that.

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Movies
9:03 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

In France, A Star Rises From An Oft-Neglected Place

Omar Sy plays Driss in the hit French film The Intouchables. The feel-good movie won numerous awards in France, but has met with a mixed reaction in the U.S.
Thierry Valletoux Weinstein Co.

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

Frenchman Jean Dujardin may have won this year's Academy Award for best actor for his role in The Artist, but in France he was beat out for the country's most prestigious acting award, the Cesar, by a new acting sensation: The 34-year-old son of African immigrants, Omar Sy.

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Music
5:25 pm
Wed June 27, 2012

Third Time's The Charm: J-Lo And Pitbull 'Dance Again'

Jennifer Lopez and Pitbull perform onstage at the 2011 American Music Awards in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

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Shots - Health Blog
10:42 am
Wed June 27, 2012

FDA Approves First New Weight-Loss Drug In More Than A Decade

Belviq, the first new prescription drug in years to help people lose weight, is expected to be available in four to six months.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 9:34 am

For the first time in 13 years, the Food and Drug Administration has approved a new drug to help people lose weight.

The FDA gave the green light to Arena Pharmaceuticals to sell Belviq, or lorcaserin generically, a twice-a-day pill that suppresses appetite and appears to affect metabolism by influencing levels of the brain chemical serotonin.

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