All Things Considered

Monday through Friday on News and Talk and News and Classical 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Technology
2:15 pm
Sat April 12, 2014

Diagnosing And Treating The Internet's Heartbleed Bug

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 3:44 pm

Encryption software meant to protect users online had a giant hole in it. Researchers found the Heartbleed bug Monday but Jordan Robertson from Bloomberg Businessweek tells guest host Tess Vigeland says it's been around for a while.

This Week's Must Read
4:00 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Poisoned Cigars And A Painful Chapter In Our History

Courtesy of New Press

Originally published on Sat April 12, 2014 8:54 am

The 50th anniversary of the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act is almost upon us, but the celebrations began this week at the Johnson presidential library. A speech by President Obama referenced "doors of opportunity" swung open by the passage of this piece of landmark legislation. But for those of us who remember when the doors were tightly shut, other images come to mind. No, it's not the soft, grainy black-and-white images of well-dressed men and women marching nobly to end the evils of segregation. What we see is churches on fire, smoke and violence.

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Deep In The Heart Of (A Transforming) Texas
1:59 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

LBJ Carried Poor Texas Town With Him In Civil Rights Fight

Long before he was president, Lyndon Johnson taught in Cotulla, Texas. He is pictured here with students in 1928.
Courtesy of LBJ Library

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 10:34 pm

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All Tech Considered
1:19 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Can't Ask That? Some Job Interviewers Go To Social Media Instead

In the hiring process, there are things employers aren't permitted to ask, like whether you plan to have kids. Some employers turn to social media to learn more about job candidates.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 10:49 am

Many of Don Kluemper's management students at the University of Illinois at Chicago have had this experience: After going on a job interview, they sometimes receive "friend" requests from their interviewers.

It puts the students in a bind, he says. They fear that not accepting the request might hurt their job chances, but they also feel compelled to scrub their profiles before accepting.

"They didn't know why they were being friended," Kluemper says. "If it was some personal request or if the person was going to be screening their profile."

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Business
1:06 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

GM Recall Distrust Trickles Down To Dealers

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:13 pm

The General Motors recall puts its dealerships in an uncomfortable spot, having to placate customers as both parties wait for replacement parts to arrive. Brian Bull of WCPN reports that many are reconsidering whether they'll ever buy a GM car again.

Sports
1:06 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

NBA Commish Wades Into Debate Over Paying College Players

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:13 pm

New NBA commissioner Adam Silver made news by suggesting the league's willingness to pay college basketball players. Sportswriter Stefan Fatsis explains what might mean for professionals and students.

News
4:09 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Sebelius, Leader Of Rocky Health Care Rollout, Resigns From HHS

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:12 pm

Kathleen Sebelius has resigned from her position as secretary of health and human services. President Obama accepted her resignation, and he plans to nominate Sylvia Matthews Burwell to replace her.

Found Recipes
2:28 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Americans, Just Get Over It And Make The Souffle

Even one fluffy forkful of souffle is a worthy reward for making the effort.
Kelly Gorham Courtesy of Kelly Gorham Photography

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 9:41 am

The souffle shares this in common with some of nature's most vicious predators: It can sense fear. This, at least, according to noted American chef James Beard, who once observed, "The only thing that will make a souffle fall is if it knows you're afraid of it."

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Law
2:21 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

For Albuquerque PD, A Searing Rebuke From Justice Department

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:12 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Justice Department issued a scathing report today on the Albuquerque Police Department's use of force. Albuquerque officers have shot and killed 23 people in the last four years. Many of the victims were mentally or emotionally unstable. The report says the department has systemic deficiencies that caused the deaths and many other incidents. NPR's Ted Robbins has the story.

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Book Reviews
2:21 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

After A Disaster In 'Family Life,' Relief Never Comes

iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 5:12 pm

Some things in life are just too painful to accept, and the same is true in novels. Family Life is the story of the Mishras, who immigrate to the U.S. in the late 1970s from India. Their departure is such a big deal that townspeople gather around just to have a look at their airplane tickets. Expectations of the life that awaits them start to build. "Americans clean themselves with paper, not water," says a classmate of the younger Mishra brother, Ajay, who narrates the novel. "In America, they say 'yeah' not yes," the boy goes on. To which Ajay replies, "That's nothing.

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