All Things Considered

Monday through Friday on News and Talk and News and Classical 3:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

On May 3, 1971, at 5 p.m., All Things Considered debuted on 90 public radio stations.

In the 40 years since, almost everything about the program has changed, from the hosts, producers, editors and reporters to the length of the program, the equipment used and even the audience.

However there is one thing that remains the same: each show consists of the biggest stories of the day, thoughtful commentaries, insightful features on the quirky and the mainstream in arts and life, music and entertainment, all brought alive through sound.

All Things Considered is the most listened-to, afternoon drive-time, news radio program in the country. Every weekday the two-hour show is hosted by Robert Siegel, Michele Norris and Melissa Block. In 1977, ATC expanded to seven days a week with a one-hour show on Saturdays and Sundays, currently hosted by Guy Raz.

During each broadcast, stories and reports come to listeners from NPR reporters and correspondents based throughout the United States and the world. The hosts interview newsmakers and contribute their own reporting. Rounding out the mix are the disparate voices of a variety of commentators, including Sports Commentator Stefen Fastis, Poet Andrei Codrescu and Political Columnists David Brooks and E.J. Dionne,

All Things Considered has earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the George Foster Peabody Award, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award and the Overseas Press Club Award.

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Books
12:11 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Bailey White's Thanksgiving Story: 'Call It Even'

iStockphoto.com

It's been an All Things Considered Thanksgiving tradition since 1991— a Bailey White original short story. Over the years, White's stories have included tales about a rose queen, a telephone man, an ostrich farmer and a wife exacting revenge. This year, White presents "Call It Even." It's about a shy painter who moves from Florida to Vermont and wants to feel like he fits in — so he raises a dozen turkeys.

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Music Interviews
12:00 pm
Thu November 24, 2011

Ingrid Gerdes: A Tomboy With Soul

Ingrid Gerdes says she is influenced by Southern soul-blues.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu November 24, 2011 3:28 pm

Originally from Springfield, Mo., "the Ozarks area of Missouri," Ingrid Gerdes is a neo-soul performer out of Boston, but she considers herself a Southern singer. Her latest album is titled Shed.

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Planet Money
2:28 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Boom Town, U.S.A.

Brandi and Kaylee plan to open a truck repair shop when they graduate from high school.
Robert Smith NPR

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 4:12 pm

In the small-town of Elko, ambition looks like high-heel suede booties on the floor of the auto shop at the local high school.

Brandi and Kaylee look like the Olsen twins. And they're the best auto-shop students at Elko High. The girls have a plan. Everyday out the school window, they see trucks heading up to the gold mines. Day and night. So, the girls figure, why not open a truck repair shop after they graduate?

"In Elko we've been really blessed and really lucky to actually have a good economy," Kaylee says. "We can actually have our hopes and dreams."

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Music Interviews
2:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Robert Johnson And Pablo Casals' Game-Changers Turn 75

Spanish musician and composer Pablo Casals, playing the cello in 1936.
Fox Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Fri November 25, 2011 1:45 pm

Nov. 23, 1936, was a good day for recorded music. Two men, an ocean apart, each stepped up to a microphone and began to play. One was a cello prodigy who had performed for the queen of Spain; the other was a guitar player in the juke joints of the Mississippi Delta. But on that day, Pablo Casals and Robert Johnson each made recordings that would change music history.

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The Salt
1:05 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Where Turkey Is The Guest, Not The Entree

Isabella Colbdorf feeds salad to a turkey at this year's Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York, on Nov. 20, 2011.
Emma Jacobs WRVO

Originally published on Wed November 23, 2011 4:12 pm

Most people think of turkeys as the centerpiece of the Thanksgiving meal. But at one farm, the turkeys are the guests.

At the 26th annual Feeding of the Turkeys ceremony in Watkins Glen, in upstate New York, a line of turkeys come walking out the door of the barn. They stroll towards long low tables set up on the lawn, with scarlet tablecloths and seasonal squash centerpieces.

There, a feast awaits. There's pumpkin pie topped with cranberry, and platters of green salad — hold the dressing. The spread is surrounded by a crowd of spectators.

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NPR Story
1:00 pm
Wed November 23, 2011

Yemen's President Agrees To Relinquish Power

Yemen's President Ali Abdullah Saleh has flown to the Saudi capital, Riyadh, where Yemeni officials signed an agreement to relinquish power to his vice president. The accord could mark the end of more than 11 months of crisis and violence that has left Yemen on the brink of civil war. Guy Raz talks to Tom Finn, who is covering the story for the Guardian newspaper.

Law
6:09 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

Government Whistle-Blowers Gain New Advocate

Carolyn Lerner is the new head of the U.S. Office of Special Counsel.
Peter Krogh Courtesy of U.S. Office of Special Counsel

The U.S. Office of Special Counsel is one of those small corners of the government with an important mission: It's supposed to help protect federal whistle-blowers and shield civil service workers from politics.

But during the Bush years, the office was engulfed in scandal. It was raided by FBI agents, and its chief was indicted for obstructing justice.

It's into that unsettled environment that the new leader, Carolyn Lerner, arrived five months ago. And good government groups say she's already taking the office in new directions.

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Planet Money
2:17 pm
Tue November 22, 2011

The National Debt: What The Left And Right Agree On

Supercommittee members, Sen. Jon Kyl of Arizona and Sen. John Kerry of Massachusetts.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Mon November 28, 2011 9:15 am

The congressional supercommittee announced Monday that it failed to come to an agreement on reducing the deficit. After three months of negotiating, the Democrats and Republicans just couldn't agree on how much spending to cut or how high to raise taxes.

But this is not a story about how the left and right disagree with each other. In fact, they actually largely agree.

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Economy
4:20 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Obama Blames Republicans For Debt Panel's Failure

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 7:27 pm

President Obama Monday put the blame for the supercommittee's failure squarely on congressional Republicans — and their unwillingness to consider higher taxes on the wealthy. Obama also threatened to veto any effort to escape from the automatic spending cuts agreed to in August without a balanced plan to reduce the deficit. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Scott Horsley for more.

Economy
4:17 pm
Mon November 21, 2011

Supercommittee Fails To Reach Debt Deal

The bipartisan supercommittee says it failed to reach a deficit-reduction deal. NPR's Tamara Keith speaks to Robert Siegel with the latest from Capitol Hill.

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