Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan joined the KNAU staff as newscast manager in 2013. He’s covered a broad range of stories from local and state politics to environment, education and economic issues. He’s also covered wildfire in northern Arizona, including the 2014 Slide Fire that became the largest in the history of the Coconino National Forest. From time to time, Ryan interviews both internationally known and regional musicians, and he’s a regular contributor to NPR News and National Native News.

Before making the leap to public radio, Ryan spent a decade working in print media. As the editor of an alternative-weekly paper, he covered arts, entertainment and local culture and dabbled in political writing with a weekly column.

He earned his bachelor’s degree from Northern Arizona University in political science and journalism, and in the past has returned to teach at his alma mater.

Ryan is also a Flagstaff-based musician and has performed and recorded with many bands in the Southwest. He spends as much time as possible with his wife and daughter hiking and cycling the amazing terrain of northern Arizona.

Ways to Connect

Havasupai Tribe

A bill introduced by Republican Arizona senators John McCain and Jeff Flake would settle claims to water from the Colorado River made by the Hualapai Tribe. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the tribe says the deal is vital to sustain its population and enhance economic development.


Michael Chow/Arizona Republic

Arizona voters will decide in November on Proposition 206, which would eventually raise the state’s minimum wage to $12 per hour. Democratic Congresswoman and U.S. Senate candidate Ann Kirkpatrick has officially endorsed the initiative. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


John Fowler/Flickr

A new bipartisan poll shows more than 80 percent of Americans support the proposed Greater Grand Canyon Heritage National Monument. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the survey was conducted by two national research firms — one Republican and one Democrat. 


serc.carleton.edu

There are more than 500 abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation and only a handful have ever been cleaned up. Now, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has begun the long-term process to make the most dangerous of those mines safe for the environment and public health. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


thedenverchannel.com

A bipartisan group of U.S. Senators wants to speed up and expand payments to those affected by last year’s toxic Gold King Mine spill in Colorado. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency stopped covering emergency responses for tribes, local governments and individuals. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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