Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan was born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma. After a trip to the Grand Canyon as a kid, he became entranced with the Southwest and the Colorado Plateau, and has now lived in Flagstaff for more than a decade-and-a-half.

Before joining the KNAU newsroom as local content manger, Ryan served as the editor for the local weekly paper, Flagstaff Live, for nearly 10 years. It helped Ryan develop strong ties to ­– and a deep love for –Flagstaff and northern Arizona.

As a longtime local musician Ryan has performed, recorded and hit the road with several bands over the years. He can currently be seen playing regular gigs with the Voluntary String Band around Flagstaff and many other Southwestern live-music locales.

Ryan also spends his spare attempting to keep up with his wife while mountain biking, and showing their baby daughter the amazing peaks, forests, canyons, and culture of northern Arizona.

Ways To Connect

NAU

Arizona’s most recent budget cut nearly a $100 million from the state’s three public universities. Northern Arizona University alone will lose $17.3 million and officials there have responded with a tuition increase for incoming students and the restructuring of several programs. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius sat down with NAU President Rita Cheng this week to discuss how the university is dealing with the cuts and what the future of higher education in the state might look like.

Alexa Rogals/The Daily Times

Navajo President Russell Begaye has altered his position on the development of a tram at the Grand Canyon. Earlier this week at his inauguration, the new president signed an agreement supporting the Escalade Project. But as Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, now President Begaye seems to have changed his mind.

Mark Henle/The Republic

A recent report shows Arizona leading the nation in cuts to higher education since the Great Recession. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the study comes just months after the state trimmed nearly $100 million from its three public universities.

Navajo Nation

Outgoing Navajo Nation President Ben Shelly is expected to sign legislation that will fund the construction of a large golden-eagle aviary. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the move will expand a current program allowing tribal members to legally obtain the feathers of federally protected birds for ceremonial purposes. 

mtveederfiresafe.org

Officials with the Kaibab National Forest are encouraging residents who live in wooded areas to remove potential fire fuel from their properties. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, they’ll be able to dispose of yard debris at a cinder pit near Parks.

Grand Canyon River Outfitters Association

For the first time, a hybrid-electric motor has powered a Colorado River trip through the entire Grand Canyon. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the technology is being developed through a partnership between commercial river outfitters and the National Park Service.

The initial public comment period has begun for a series of road improvements on the Kaibab National Forest in the Town of Tusayan. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius report, if approved it’ll pave the way for a large development project near the South Rim of the Grand Canyon.

NBC News

After five months of delay, the U.S. Senate has confirmed Loretta Lynch to serve as attorney general. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the state’s Republican Senators were split on the nominee to lead the Justice Department.

USFS

Supervisors with the Coconino and Kaibab national forests have given final approval of the Four Forests Restoration Initiative, or 4FRI. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, officials say the program will restore forest health and decrease wildfire danger. 

ABC News

A 2016 ballot initiative that would legalize recreational marijuana in Arizona has been registered with the secretary of state’s office. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, if passed it would mean the state would control the marijuana industry.

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