Ryan Heinsius

Executive Producer/Local Content Manager

Ryan was born and raised in Tulsa, Oklahoma. After a trip to the Grand Canyon as a kid, he became entranced with the Southwest and the Colorado Plateau, and has now lived in Flagstaff for more than a decade-and-a-half.

Before joining the KNAU newsroom as local content manger, Ryan served as the editor for the local weekly paper, Flagstaff Live, for nearly 10 years. It helped Ryan develop strong ties to ­– and a deep love for –Flagstaff and northern Arizona.

As a longtime local musician Ryan has performed, recorded and hit the road with several bands over the years. He can currently be seen playing regular gigs with the Voluntary String Band around Flagstaff and many other Southwestern live-music locales.

Ryan also spends his spare attempting to keep up with his wife while mountain biking, and showing their baby daughter the amazing peaks, forests, canyons, and culture of northern Arizona.

Ways To Connect

AP

Arizona unexpectedly ended the 2015 fiscal year $325 million in the black. As a result, some lawmakers are discussing restoring the funds cut from the state’s three public universities in the current budget. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Courtesy

Earlier this week, Navajo farmers in New Mexico voted to keep irrigation canals along the San Juan River closed for at least a year. They have concerns about soil contamination following the Gold King Mine spill in Colorado. Meanwhile, officials in Page are worried about the incident causing a drain on the local economy, even though scientists say Lake Powell remains mostly unaffected.  Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

The Coloradoan

A group supporting the legalization of recreational marijuana in Arizona says its proposed ballot initiative could pump millions dollars into state education every year. 

thedrinkingbirdblog.com/

Two environmental groups have filed objections to a forest-thinning project designed to protect Flagstaff’s watershed from wildfire and flooding. The groups say the plan would have negative effects on the threatened Mexican spotted owl. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 

AP/Matt York

Arizona environmental officials say they don’t expect the Gold King Mine spill to have any negative impacts to the state’s watershed. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, they say Lake Powell will likely disperse the waste made up of several heavy metals.

azlibrary.gov

The most recent report from the U.S. Census Bureau puts Arizona near the bottom of the list for K-through-12 public-education spending. That comes as most states are increasing the amount dedicated to schools. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Jerry McBride/Durango Herald

The toxic plume from the Gold King Mine spill in Colorado last week is no longer visible as it’s mixed with the murky San Juan River. Officials say it’s uncertain whether the polluted water has reached Lake Powell. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

endangeredwolfcenter.org

State wildlife officials have voted to increase the practice of “cross-fostering” Mexican gray wolves. That’s the substitution of captive-raised pups for wild ones in hopes of increasing genetic diversity. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.

Donovan Quintero/Navajo Times

The 3 million gallons of mining waste that spilled into Colorado’s Animas River is now flowing into the San Juan River on the Navajo Nation. Tribal officials have declared a state of emergency and are preparing to sue the Environmental Protection Agency. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 

Lake Mead National Recreation Area

Prolonged drought in the Southwest has caused a rapid drop in the water level of Lake Mead. That’s putting water supplies to some major cities in jeopardy. But it’s also exposed some of the area’s history and a long-submerged town. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 

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