Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

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Kaibab Paiute Nation

Northern Arizona is now home to the world’s first "dark sky nation." As Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians has been recognized for its efforts to preserve the night sky.

National Park Service

Rumors of a steam plume coming from Sunset Crater near Flagstaff have been making a buzz on the Internet. But as Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports, officials with the national monument say there’s no sign of geologic activity.

Cindy Carpien/NPR

Chilly winters and sunny skies make Flagstaff an ideal place for passive solar construction. A house with the right orientation and south-facing windows can collect free energy from the sun—no solar panels required. But one thing stands in the way of Flagstaff becoming a model for passive solar home design: the beauty of a mountain.

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