Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has created a new online tool that identifies communities facing environmental health risks. Parts of northern Arizona are among the nation’s most vulnerable regions.

A group of scientists is calling for a moratorium on the development of tar sands and oil shale in North America. The Colorado River Basin contains the largest untapped deposits of oil shale in the world.

More than 100 scientists have asked policy leaders to consider the potential global impacts of developing tar sands and oil shale. They say the carbon-intensive extraction process is incompatible with limiting climate change.

Thomas Sisk, an ecology professor at Northern Arizona University, is one of the lead authors.

The Verde Valley Archeology Center

A collection of Native American artifacts from an excavation in Cottonwood inspired the creation of the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. As Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that collection has come home to the Verde Valley.

Kaibab Paiute Nation

Northern Arizona is now home to the world’s first "dark sky nation." As Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports, the Kaibab Band of Paiute Indians has been recognized for its efforts to preserve the night sky.

National Park Service

Rumors of a steam plume coming from Sunset Crater near Flagstaff have been making a buzz on the Internet. But as Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports, officials with the national monument say there’s no sign of geologic activity.

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