Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

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Melissa Sevigny

An association of British science teachers sent a letter of rebuke to the Arizona Department of Education for its controversial attitude toward evolution. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


Rose Houk

The ancestors of northern Arizona's elk were brought here from Wyoming more than a century ago. This spring, a group of those elk took another journey, to West Virginia.


Coconino National Forest

Wildfire seasons in the West are growing longer and more intense. So more prescribed burns are happening to protect forest towns in places like northern Arizona. That can be hard on the health of residents and firefighters. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, not much is known about the long-term effects of breathing forest fire smoke.

U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

The U.S. Bureau of Reclamation projects a 52 percent chance of a water shortage on the Colorado River in 2020. Arizona would bear the brunt of mandatory cutbacks. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.


National Park Service/S. Sparhawk

The standards for teaching Science, and History, to Arizona schoolkids are undergoing their first revisions in more than a decade. A committee of 100 educators, parents and community members hammered out the Science document in a year-long process. But the Department of Education made unexpected last-minute changes, shifting from big ideas to vocabulary words and watering down the concept of evolution. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, some experts are alarmed.

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