Melissa Sevigny

Science & Technology Reporter

Melissa grew up in Tucson, Arizona, where she fell in love with the ecology and geology of the Sonoran desert. She has a B.S. in Environmental Science from the University of Arizona and an M.FA. in Creative Writing and Environment from Iowa State University. Her first book, Mythical River, forthcoming from the University of Iowa Press, is about water issues in the Southwest. She has worked as a science communicator for NASA’s Phoenix Mars Scout Mission, the Water Resources Research Center, and the Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture. Melissa relocated to Flagstaff in 2015 to join KNAU’s team. She enjoys hiking, fishing and reading fantasy novels.

Ways to Connect

CDC/Amanda Mills

A report from the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine says states need to adopt stricter laws about blood alcohol concentration to prevent fatal car crashes. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Melissa Sevigny

Two new books chronicle Flagstaff’s long history with everybody’s favorite dwarf planet, Pluto. It was discovered at Lowell Observatory in 1930 and it’s been the toast of the town ever since. Local scientists have been involved with nearly every major Pluto discovery, including the recent flyby by NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny brought the authors of the new books into the studio to have a conversation about why they think little Pluto is a big deal for Flagstaff.

Arizona Department of Water Resources

The managers of the Central Arizona Project want to purchase farmland in Mohave County and send the water to the suburbs of Phoenix and Tucson. Local communities oppose the transfer. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.

Melissa Sevigny

Yesterday we heard about northern Arizona’s tree thinning projects and who makes the decision on which trees to cut. In part 2 of that story, what happens to those trees afterward? Flagstaff has always been a logging town, but things have changed. When the U.S. Forest Service began to thin the woods almost a decade ago reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfires, some thought it would bring a second economic boom for the logging industry. As KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that heyday hasn’t happened.

Melissa Sevigny

Northern Arizona is home to the largest ponderosa pine forest in the world. If you’ve ever hiked through it, you’ve probably seen trees marked with brightly colored paint. That paint is a kind of map for the logging companies that thin the woods and make them more fire-resistant. But which trees get to stay and which have to go—and who makes those decisions? KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports.