Gillian Ferris

Managing Editor

Gillian came to KNAU in 2001 as a freelance reporter. Her first story won an Arizona Associated Press Award. Since then, Gillian has won more than a dozen Edward R. Murrow Awards for feature reporting, writing and documentary work. She served as the local anchor for NPR’s Morning Edition for 8 years before moving into a full time reporting position in 2012. Gillian covers everything from environmental issues to sports, with a penchant for human interest stories of all kinds. When she’s not working, Gillian revels in the natural world and is an avid hiker, skier, swimmer, river runner and surfer. She also enjoys making fancy cakes and reorganizing her collection of fabulous shoes… 70 pairs and counting.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy photo

Monday marks one year since a gunman killed dozens of people and wounded dozens more inside the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida. The terrorist attack targeted people from the LGBTQ community. In response to the tragedy, a spiritual counselor from Sedona has designed a first-of-its-kind LGBTQ Wellness Summit. The online program invites people from all of over the world to workshops on health, relationships and coming out. Lori Morrison spoke to KNAU’s Gillian Ferris about the project. 


It’s been millions of years since there was an ocean in Arizona. But tonight, the tide rolls back in. The Flagstaff Mountain Film Festival is hosting the Save the Waves Film Festival, a night of ocean activism from the viewpoint of surfers. Flagstaff is the first landlocked city to screen the films. Trey Highton is the director of the Save the Waves Coalition, and a lifelong surfer. He spoke with KNAU’s Gillian Ferris about the importance of taking care of the world’s oceans whether you live near or far from shore. 

  


Gillian Ferris/KNAU

The Second Chance Center for Animals in Flagstaff closes today. Officials cite funding issues as the reason. The shelter has played a critical role in animal rescue for years, not just in Flagstaff, but also on the Navajo Nation and across the Southwest. It was known as a "rescue for the rescues", taking overflow from dozens of other shelters, and operating with a "no kill" philosophy. KNAU had been working on a story involving Second Chance when the closure was announced. It was a profile of photographer Nanette Martin, who specializes in shelter pet portraits. Second Chance was the first stop on her year-long tour across the country, teaching photography and social media workshops as a way to boost adoption rates. Though Second Chance is now shuttered, we decided to run the piece anyway as it speaks to the tremendous need for animal shelters in our communities. 


The Center SF

The Army Corps of Engineers has ordered thousands of demonstrators near the Standing Rock Sioux Nation to leave by Monday. They’ve been camped on federal land for months, trying to stop a massive oil pipeline project they believe will contaminate water sources and destroy sacred sites. Most of these “Water Protectors” are members of Native American tribes. And they believe the federal government and the mainstream media don’t understand the true purpose of their mission: that water has deep cultural and spiritual significance to indigenous people. In this audio postcard, we bring you the voices of two Arizonans who went to Standing Rock to protect the water they believe embodies life itself.


President-elect Donald Trump has promised mass deportations upon taking office. Many universities, colleges and community colleges are responding by adopting Sanctuary Campus status, which pledges certain protections to undocumented students registered in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Program, or DACA. Next week, Northern Arizona University will decide whether it will become a Sanctuary Campus. KNAU’s Gillian Ferris spoke with Dr.

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