Diane Hope

Kurt Refsnider

Geologists know there’s no better place to see Earth’s history laid bare than on the Colorado Plateau. Prescott College professors Kurt Refsnider and Kaitlyn Boyle make the subject come alive for their students in a novel way—from the seat of a bicycle. 


Jesse Barber

Many insects and spiders rely on sounds and vibrations to find food, meet mates and detect predators. So it’s likely they’d be sensitive to the roar of heavy machinery. 


Earth Notes: Quiet Parks

Aug 16, 2017
National Park Service

Bugling elk, rolling thunder, the delicate trill of a hummingbird’s wings. These natural sounds can be heard in America’s national parks—some of the quietest places on Earth. 


Kaibab National Forest

Wildfires in the West have gotten bigger and more intense over the last 40 years. The amount of land area burned has increased six-fold. On the Colorado Plateau, fires strip away plant life and open up a window to the past, revealing information from thousands of years ago.


NOAA

The National Weather Service operates a widely spaced Doppler radar network across our region—from Blue Ridge Reservoir south of Flagstaff to Albuquerque, Las Vegas, and Grand Junction, Colorado. 


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