Diane Hope

Elizabeth Barrett, Animalphotos.me

Summer bird life is in full swing in the pine forests of northern Arizona. But back in the 1800s there was a colorful, noisy addition to the scene – parrots.


Jo Mora/Northern Arizona University's Cline Library

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the fifth installment of the series, we look at Hubbell Trading Post in Ganado, Ariz., which served as a community hub since it opened in the 1870s. 


NPS/B. Sutton

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the second installment of the series, we hear about how Wupatki's population survived there a thousand years ago despite the area's extreme arid environment.

The region around Wupatki National Monument on the San Francisco Plateau is so dry it was called the Sierra Sin Agua, or “Mountains Without Water,” by early Spanish explorers. Yet from the 11th to 13th centuries this region supported a population of between several hundred and 2,000 people. How did they do it?


U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Roundtail Chub populations have declined to the point where the fish is being considered as a candidate for the Federal Endangered Species Act. But their numbers are just fine in central Arizona. In fact, the Roundtail Chub is thriving on the Salt and Verde Rivers.


Travelers with a hankering to reconnect with nature and experience the Navajo way of life can do just that 12 miles south of Page.  A bear claw sign on Highway 89 points the way to the Shash Diné Eco-Retreat. “Shash” in the retreat’s name means “bear” in Navajo. 


Pages