Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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The Two-Way
10:20 am
Mon May 11, 2015

EU Proposes A Plan To Address The Mediterranean Migrant Crisis

The Italian coast guard pulls migrants from an inflatable dinghy off the Libyan coast in the Mediterranean Sea last month. European Union leaders have submitted a plan of action to save lives in the Mediterranean.
Alessandro Di Meo AP

The European Union has presented a proposal to the United Nations aiming to stem the flood of migrants from the Middle East and Africa to Europe. The plan includes seizing and destroying the boats that smugglers are using to transport the migrants across the Mediterranean Sea. The EU's foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, briefed the U.N. Security Council on the proposal Monday morning. "We need to count on your support to save lives," Mogherini told council members.

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The Two-Way
10:21 am
Fri May 8, 2015

Move Over Mount Rushmore, There's Another Club Of Presidents

The statues of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Teddy Roosevelt and Abraham Lincoln at Mount Rushmore in South Dakota.
AP

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 2:27 pm

President Obama is accomplishing something today that few of his predecessors can claim. He's going to South Dakota — and his visit will allow him to brag that he has now set foot in each of the 50 states. In fact, only three U.S. presidents can make that claim: Richard Nixon, George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton.

(George W. Bush went to 49, but never made it to Vermont.)

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Thu May 7, 2015

Whole Foods Launching Lower-Cost Stores Geared Toward Millennials

A man carries a surfboard past a Whole Foods store in Santa Monica, Calif. Whole Foods Market Inc. reported underwhelming second-quarter earnings on Wednesday.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 1:00 pm

Whole Foods, the upscale grocery store chain famous for its bright displays of produce and emphasis on organic foods, plans to launch a new chain of lower-priced stores aimed at millennial shoppers.

The yet-to-be-named stores will "feature a modern streamlined design, innovative technology and a curated selection," the company says in a statement.

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It's All Politics
2:01 am
Thu May 7, 2015

A Long Way From Wax Cylinders, Library Of Congress Slowly Joins The Digital Age

Gene DeAnna is curator of the National Jukebox project, which is an online collection of more than 10,000 pre-1925 recordings.
Brian Naylor NPR

Originally published on Thu May 7, 2015 7:03 am

Gene DeAnna sits at a computer next to a vintage Victrola, appropriate for his job as curator of the National Jukebox project.

It's an online collection of some 10,000 pre-1925 recordings, made acoustically, without any electrical amplification. DeAnna points to a photo on the jukebox's Web page.

"You can see in this picture here that they gathered the orchestra around a great big recording horn and behind the curtain there is a cutter that is cutting the recording into a wax master," he said.

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It's All Politics
2:03 am
Sun May 3, 2015

5 Things You Should Know About Carly Fiorina

Carly Fiorina at a luncheon Tuesday with New Hampshire Republican lawmakers.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Mon May 4, 2015 10:56 am

This post was updated at 8:10 a.m. E.T. Monday

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It's All Politics
12:54 pm
Tue April 21, 2015

Should The Government Get Out Of The Air Traffic Control Business?

An air traffic control tower at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport.
Ted S. Warren AP

Originally published on Tue April 21, 2015 3:25 pm

Keeping track of the traffic in the skies above us is a big job. The nation's air traffic control system has been reliable, but it's not very efficient. And efforts to replace it with newer technology have gotten bogged down by a combination of uncertain congressional funding and the slow-moving federal bureaucracy. Now, some in Congress want to get the government out of the air traffic control business.

The Federal Aviation Administration says some 7,000 aircraft are over the U.S. at any given time.

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It's All Politics
2:12 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing A 'Wake-Up Call' For Government Security

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was "literally right up against the road so it was extremely vulnerable," said architect Barbara Nadel. One of the government's first responses was to close a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 10:22 am

Twenty years ago this Sunday, a truck bomb exploded next to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. One hundred sixty-eight people were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured.

The bombing prompted heightened security at federal buildings — around the nation, and especially here in Washington.

One of the government's first responses to the bombing was closing a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

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The Two-Way
10:40 am
Tue March 24, 2015

House Panel Releases Video Of Secret Service Barricade Incident

Originally published on Tue March 24, 2015 12:19 pm

A congressional panel on Tuesday released a video surveillance tape of an incident near the White House in which a government car driven by Secret Service agents appears to brush a barrier in an area where a suspicious package was being investigated.

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It's All Politics
1:55 pm
Fri March 20, 2015

It's All About The Benjamins And Jacksons — But What About The Women?

"There hasn't been a change of the portraits since 1929 ... it's time to bring our money into the 21st century," says Susan Ades Stone, spokeswoman for Women on 20s.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Fri March 20, 2015 4:58 pm

The college basketball playoffs have turned March into a month when many of us become bracket watchers. There is another playoff taking place that you may not have heard of — an online campaign to choose a woman to put on the $20 bill.

If you look into your wallet, whether you're feeling flush, or not, there's one thing the bills you do find all have in common ... the faces of dead white men. Most are presidents: Washington, Lincoln and Jackson. A few, Hamilton and Franklin among them, famous for other reasons. But not one of the faces is female.

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Politics
3:53 pm
Tue March 17, 2015

Secret Service Director Grilled About Agency Scandals In House Hearing

Originally published on Tue March 17, 2015 5:18 pm

Secret Service Director Joseph Clancy told the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security Tuesday that it took five days before he was informed that a car carrying two agents struck a security barrier outside the White House.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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