Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a blogger and producer who works with NPR's Morning Edition and Digital Media group. In addition to coordinating Web features, he frequently contributes to NPR's blogs, from The Two Way and All Tech Considered to The Salt.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to leading the London 2012 Olympics blog, The Torch. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, the site won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell trains both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between departments. Other shows he has worked with include All Things Considered, Fresh Air, and Talk of the Nation.

Prior to joining NPR in late 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage out of Qatar.

Chappell's work for CNN also included producing Web stories and editing digital video for SI.com, as well as editing and producing stories for CNN.com's features division. He also worked at the network's video and research library.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as editor-in-chief of The Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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The Two-Way
4:42 pm
Mon December 8, 2014

New York City Council Will Weigh Ban On Horse-Drawn Carriages

A horse-drawn carriage operator waits for riders near Central Park in New York on October 20, 2014. Mayor Bill de Blasio is backing legislation that would ban such carriages in 2016.
JEWEL SAMAD AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 5:15 pm

Following up on a controversial campaign promise, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio's bill to ban horse-drawn carriages reached the City Council on Monday, in a move to phase out the carriages that often give tours around Central Park.

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The Two-Way
3:22 pm
Mon December 8, 2014

(Not) Eaten Alive: A Snake Tale, Made For TV

A still image from the Discovery TV special Eaten Alive, which angered some viewers after it aired Sunday.
Discovery

Originally published on Tue December 9, 2014 11:31 am

The outcome of an outlandish TV stunt Sunday night didn't go down well with many viewers, who say they were duped into expecting that the Discovery special Eaten Alive would actually portray a man being ingested by an anaconda.

But that didn't happen, forcing the network to defend the program today by saying it had been naturalist Paul Rosolie's "absolute intention to be eaten alive."

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The Two-Way
3:45 pm
Thu December 4, 2014

At Beer Mile Championships, Scientist Sets New Women's Record

In an image from video of the men's event at the Beer Mile World Championships, competitors are seen poised to open their beers, which they'll guzzle before taking off on their first of four laps.
Flocast

In a dizzying finish, American scientist Elizabeth Herndon set a new women's world record in the Beer Mile World Championships in Austin, Texas, last night, breaking through a tight field to obliterate the previous mark by 11 seconds.

In the men's race, Canadian mailman Corey Gallagher relied on fast drinking to separate himself from the field, turning in a time a hair over 5 minutes, just three seconds off the men's world record.

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The Two-Way
1:01 pm
Thu December 4, 2014

NYC Police Will Be Retrained, De Blasio Says At News Conference

Originally published on Thu December 4, 2014 4:08 pm

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and New York Police Department Commissioner Bill Bratton have announced plans to give training to police officers to help them treat all citizens with equal respect and with equal regard for their safety.

"These changes are happening because the people demanded it," de Blasio said.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Wed December 3, 2014

'Black Lives Matter,' NYC Mayor Says After Grand Jury Doesn't Indict Officer

Eric Garner (right) poses with his children. A grand jury has decided not to indict a New York police officer over Garner's death in July.
Family photo via National Action Network AP

Originally published on Thu December 4, 2014 11:34 am

A grand jury has decided not to indict a New York police officer in the death of Eric Garner on a Staten Island sidewalk this past July.

"It's a very painful day for so many New Yorkers," Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday.

The encounter between Garner and officer Daniel Pantaleo caused an uproar after video footage of the incident was released. It showed Garner repeatedly gasping, "I can't breathe," as Pantaleo and other officers took him to the ground.

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The Two-Way
2:23 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

A #SadTree Lot: Your Photos Of The Charlie Browniest Trees

So festive: Latte the Pomeranian poses in a reader-submitted photo, part of a look at the humblest Christmas trees.
Lindsey Gelormini/Twitter

Originally published on Tue December 2, 2014 3:20 pm

To mark 50 years of A Charlie Brown Christmas airing on American televisions, our readers are sharing photos and memories of Christmas trees that reflect the spirit of that TV classic: a bit forlorn, perhaps, but full of heart.

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The Two-Way
12:02 pm
Tue December 2, 2014

Chicago Council Strongly Approves $13 Minimum Wage

A new minimum wage was approved Tuesday in Chicago, where fast food workers and activists demonstrated outside McDonald's downtown restaurant this summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue December 2, 2014 1:13 pm

By a 44-5 vote, Chicago's City Council set a minimum-wage target of $13 an hour, to be reached by the middle of 2019. The move comes after Illinois passed a nonbinding advisory last month that calls for the state to raise its minimum pay level to $10 by the start of next year.

The current minimum wage in Chicago and the rest of Illinois is $8.25. Under the ordinance, the city's minimum wage will rise to $10 by next July and go up in increments each summer thereafter.

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The Two-Way
2:59 pm
Mon December 1, 2014

Bill Cosby Resigns From Temple University's Board

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 3:53 pm

In the latest development after a series of rape allegations were made against him, comedian Bill Cosby has resigned from the board of trustees at Temple University. The move was announced in a short news release in which Cosby cited "the best interests of the university and its students."

Cosby has had a lasting relationship with Temple, dating back to his first years at the school in the 1960s (he dropped out to pursue his comedy career but returned to graduate in 1971).

On Monday, the school issued a short news release, consisting of two statements:

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The Two-Way
11:41 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Protests Of Grand Jury Decision Fan Out Across The Country

People gather outside the Los Angeles Police Department headquarters on Tuesday.
Nick Ut AP

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 7:04 am

Updated at 6:54 a.m.

Public reaction to a Missouri grand jury's decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson has ranged from fire and looting close to where Wilson shot Michael Brown to peaceful protests nearby.

Other protests were held in large and small cities and college towns across America on Tuesday; photos from those scenes show a variety of demonstrators, tactics and responses.

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The Two-Way
2:38 pm
Tue November 25, 2014

Missouri Governor Adds 'Significantly' To National Guard In Ferguson

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said that parts of Ferguson were "a heartbreaking sight" Tuesday, with residents afraid to go outside.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 3:43 pm

"The violence we saw in areas of Ferguson last night cannot be repeated," Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon said Tuesday, announcing that he is sending hundreds more members of the National Guard to the city that saw intense looting on Monday night.

"Last night, criminals intent on lawlessness and destruction terrorized this community," Nixon said, "burning buildings, firing gunshots, vandalizing storefronts, and looting family businesses — many for the second time."

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