Aaron Granillo

Morning Edition Host / Reporter

Aaron moved from his hometown of Seattle to Phoenix in 2006 to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. He received his degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at ASU in 2010. Before joining KNAU as the Morning Edition host, Aaron spent nearly four years writing and reporting for Arizona’s Morning News at KTAR in Phoenix. He covered everything from immigration issues to sports. While there, he won an Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound. When not working, Aaron enjoys following Seattle’s sports teams, hiking, and practicing piano (which he just started playing in 2013).

Ways to Connect

Sean Logan/The Arizona Republic

There was high drama at the Arizona State Capitol yesterday, as lawmakers voted to expel Yuma Representative Don Shooter. The nearly unanimous vote came after a report, which showed Shooter engaged in a longstanding pattern of sexual harassment. KNAU’S Aaron Granillo reports.


Medical Marijuana Market

A Lake Havasu City Republican wants Arizona’s medical marijuana to be tested for mold and pesticides. Senator Sonny Borelli says he wants to ensure patients know what they’re consuming. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo reports.


Jon Austria/The Farmington Daily Times

A New Mexico teacher has developed a braille code for the Navajo language. Carol Green works for the Farmington Municipal School District, teaching students who are visually impaired. The code she created uses the English braille system with unique changes to account for the nuances of the Diné language. She spoke about it with KNAU's Aaron Granillo.


Aaron Granillo/KNAU

KNAU checks in with Nephi Craig, a White Mountain Apache Chef, who gives new life to the food his ancestors cooked. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo reports Craig now uses indigenous food as a form of medicine to help fellow Apaches overcome addiction.


Actor George Takei became famous in the 1960s, playing the role of Mr. Sulu in the original Star Trek series. He then went on to a second career as a social activist and pop culture icon. By far, his most personal work is the Broadway musical, Allegiance, inspired by his childhood experience in a Japanese-American internment camp during World War II. Takei will speak about his life and activism tonight at Northern Arizona University. He spoke with KNAU’s Aaron Granillo.

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