Aaron Granillo

Morning Edition Host / Reporter

Aaron moved from his hometown of Seattle to Phoenix in 2006 to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. He received his degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at ASU in 2010. Before joining KNAU as the Morning Edition host, Aaron spent nearly four years writing and reporting for Arizona’s Morning News at KTAR in Phoenix. He covered everything from immigration issues to sports. While there, he won an Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound. When not working, Aaron enjoys following Seattle’s sports teams, hiking, and practicing piano (which he just started playing in 2013).

Ways to Connect

Aaron Granillo/KNAU

A chef in eastern Arizona wants to save the cuisine of his ancestors. Nephi Craig is a member of the White Mountain Apache Tribe. He believes food can help his people recover from a dark past that includes war, relocation, and a food-related health crisis. Arizona Public Radio's Aaron Granillo reports.


A lot of people hike the Grand Canyon because of the scenery or because it’s on their bucket list. Flagstaff author Kevin Fedarko is hiking to raise awareness about environmental threats to one of the country’s most beloved national parks. He’s doing it in sections for a total of 650 miles. He’s documented the trek in this month’s National Geographic in an article titled, “Are We Losing The Grand Canyon?” Kevin Fedarko joins Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo to talk about his concerns for the canyon’s future.


In 1946, Nat King Cole helped put Route 66 on the map with his classic, "Get Your Kicks on Route 66." Ironically, Cole couldn’t visit most of the establishments in the cities he sang about because he was black. At the time, Jim Crow laws banned people of color from sleeping, eating, buying gas – even getting haircuts at many businesses across the country, including along the Mother Road. But there were some safe havens, like La Posada Hotel in Winslow, the White Rock Motel in Kingman, and DuBeau’s Motel Inn in Flagstaff.  These locations were listed in the Green Book, a travel guide for people of color, first published in the 1930s. Documentarian Candacy Taylor came across it, while writing a Route 66 travel guide. She believes the Green Book saved countless black lives. It’s now the focus of her new initiative, The Green Book Project.


Emergency fire shelters used by wildland firefighters may soon become more effective by using NASA technology. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports they’ll be made with similar heat-resistant materials used to enter the Martian atmosphere.


Health officials in Coconino County have confirmed a deadly case of Tularemia, better known as rabbit fever. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports the case was discovered in the Flagstaff-area.


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