Aaron Granillo

Morning Edition Host / Reporter

Aaron moved from his hometown of Seattle to Phoenix in 2006 to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. He received his degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at ASU in 2010. Before joining KNAU as the Morning Edition host, Aaron spent nearly four years writing and reporting for Arizona’s Morning News at KTAR in Phoenix. He covered everything from immigration issues to sports. While there, he won an Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound. When not working, Aaron enjoys following Seattle’s sports teams, hiking, and practicing piano (which he just started playing in 2013).

Ways to Connect

The Arizona Supreme Court on Tuesday ruled that a lesbian woman who is divorcing her spouse is entitled to equal parental rights under the U.S. Constitution, even though a state law doesn't recognize those rights.

Aaron Granillo/KNAU

About four in ten Arizona prison inmates will be back behind bars within three years. That number is far lower for a group of men at the state prison in Florence, where taming wild mustangs is part of a unique rehab program. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo reports it’s giving the inmates a fresh perspective on life, and a chance at freedom.


Aaron Granillo/KNAU

It’s mushroom hunting season in Northern Arizona. People come from all over to forage edible fungi from the monsoon-soaked woods, and they’re cooking up some tasty dishes. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo has this audio postcard in the latest installment of our occasional series, Eats and Beats, stories about food and music.


We are now days away from, what some scientists call, “the most beautiful event in the sky,” a total solar eclipse. Only some US cities will be lucky enough to see the moon completely overtake the sun on Monday, when it a casts a long, thin shadow across the country. KNAU’s science reporter Melissa Sevigny is on her way to Madras, Oregon, one of the cities located in, what’s known as, the path of totality. Melissa spoke with KNAU’s Aaron Granillo before she took off.


Pioneer Museum

The Pioneer Museum in Flagstaff is highlighting a group of people who literally helped build the city. The exhibit, Todos Unidos, chronicles Hispanic’s experience in Flagstaff, from the late 1800s to the 1950s. It was an era rife with discrimination and segregation. KNAU’s Aaron Granillo spoke with some descendants of Flagstaff’s first Hispanic families, some of whom are featured in the exhibit.


Pages