Aaron Granillo

Morning Edition Host / Reporter

Aaron moved from his hometown of Seattle to Phoenix in 2006 to pursue a career in broadcast journalism. He received his degree from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism at ASU in 2010. Before joining KNAU as the Morning Edition host, Aaron spent nearly four years writing and reporting for Arizona’s Morning News at KTAR in Phoenix. He covered everything from immigration issues to sports. While there, he won an Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound. When not working, Aaron enjoys following Seattle’s sports teams, hiking, and practicing piano (which he just started playing in 2013).

Ways to Connect

Aaron Granillo

This weekend, much of the sports world turns its attention to college basketball’s March Madness. But there’s another sporting event going on, and this one has Olympic gold on the line. The Special Olympics World Games are in Austria this year, and will be nationally televised on ESPN. Arizona is sending three athletes – all from Flagstaff. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo introduces us to one of them, Deven Taylor, a two-time Olympic cross-country skier. A former ambassador for the games, Taylor shines a spotlight on athletes who are often overlooked and stigmatized.


NAU Athletics

International students are some of the people affected by President Donald Trump’s travel ban, which remains in legal limbo following Thursday's appeals court ruling. Northern Arizona University has identified fewer than ten student whom this affects, including sophomore Peter Lomong, a track and field athlete from Sudan. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo spoke with Lomong after one of his practices.


Dawn Kish

Saturday marks one week since millions of people joined, perhaps, the largest demonstration in American history. The Women’s March on Washington went far beyond the nation’s capital, as hundreds of similar rallies took place around the world, including northern Arizona. Thousands of people turned out for sister marches in Sedona, Prescott, and Flagstaff. Award-winning photographer Dawn Kish captured the scene, as a sea of pink overflowed a snow-packed downtown Flagstaff. Kish joined Arizona Public Radio's Aaron Granillo to discuss witnessing the event, from behind the lens.


The Center SF

The Army Corps of Engineers has ordered thousands of demonstrators near the Standing Rock Sioux Nation to leave by Monday. They’ve been camped on federal land for months, trying to stop a massive oil pipeline project they believe will contaminate water sources and destroy sacred sites. Most of these “Water Protectors” are members of Native American tribes. And they believe the federal government and the mainstream media don’t understand the true purpose of their mission: that water has deep cultural and spiritual significance to indigenous people. In this audio postcard, we bring you the voices of two Arizonans who went to Standing Rock to protect the water they believe embodies life itself.


Adrian Manygoats

Thousands of people have gathered at the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, trying to stop construction of a massive oil pipeline. The Dakota Access Pipeline would carry 500,000 barrels of oil a day from North Dakota to Illinois. "Water Protectors" are concerned it will destroy sacred tribal land and contaminate drinking water. This weekend, they were subjected to water cannons at the hands of police. Dr. Michael Lerma is a professor of Native American politics at Northern Arizona University.

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