Politics
9:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

Debt Committee's Failsafe Might Already Be Undone

The debt reduction supercommittee had its first public meeting Tuesday. It would take at least seven of the supercommittee's politically divided members to approve any plan they come up with.

J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 4:19 am

The Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction — also known as the supercommittee — created by Congress this summer has just seven weeks to agree on a plan reducing projected deficits by more than a trillion dollars.

If that panel of six Democrats and six Republicans deadlocks, or if Congress rejects its work, by law automatic across-the-board budget cuts — half of them from defense spending — will be triggered. Already, talk is growing of undoing that trigger.

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Asia
9:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

China's Red-Hot Growth Gives Policymakers Pause

Earlier this year, Shanghai tried to slow down real estate sales by restricting some deals. It's part of a broader Chinese government plan to slow the country's staggering growth.
Eugene Hoshiko AP

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 4:19 am

The U.S. economy is struggling to grow. The European Union is trying to contain a debt crisis. And, in a case of bad timing, the world's fastest-growing major economy, China, is trying to slow down.

Shanghai has been one of the world's hottest real estate markets, but it's too hot for Chinese officials who are fighting high inflation and what some fear is a housing bubble.

Earlier this year, the Shanghai government tried to slow down real estate sales by restricting people from outside the city from buying more than one property.

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Law
9:01 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

In New Term, Supreme Court To Tackle Divisive Issues

Paul J. Richards AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue October 4, 2011 4:19 am

If the U.S. Supreme Court term opening Monday were a Broadway show, all eyes would be on the stars waiting in the wings.

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The Two-Way
2:22 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

NPR Names Gary Knell As New CEO/President

Incoming NPR CEO and President Gary Knell.
Sesame Workshop

Gary Knell, president and CEO of Sesame Workshop – producers of the Sesame Street educational children's TV show — has been named the new CEO and president of NPR. The news was broken this hour on Weekend All Things Considered. Knell will take the positions on Dec. 1.

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World
1:43 pm
Sun October 2, 2011

Finding The Next Steps For U.S.-Pakistan Relations

The New Yorker's Dexter Filkins reported on the killing of Pakistani journalist Syed Saleem Shahzad.
James Hill Knopf Books

Originally published on Mon October 3, 2011 1:06 am

Adm. Mike Mullen retired last week after spending four years as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff trying to improve relations between the U.S. and Pakistan.

In his parting remarks, he had some advice for his successor, Gen. Martin Dempsey.

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Jeff Brady is a NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.

In this role, Brady reports on the business of energy, from concerns over hydraulic fracturing in Western Pennsylvania to the oil boom in North Dakota and solar developments in the desert Southwest. With a focus on the consumer, Brady's reporting addresses how the energy industry intersects consumers' perspective at the gas pump and light switch.

Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has covered just about every major domestic news event in the past decade. Before moving to Philadelphia in July 2011, Brady was based in Denver and covered the west for NPR.

Around the Nation
5:06 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Wall Street Protesters Plan Long-Term Occupation

A protester marches on Friday in New York City as part of larger demonstration focused on corporations, wealth and income distribution.
Mario Tama Getty Images

A protest in New York dubbed "Occupy Wall Street" appears to be settling in for the long term. Twice a day, protesters leave the tents, makeshift kitchen and free bookstore set up in Zuccotti Park in lower Manhattan and begin a slow march down the sidewalk.

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Politics
5:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Sen. Durbin Defends Reform Despite New Bank Fees

This past week, Bank of America announced plans to charge most of its debit card users $5 a month if they use the card to make purchases. The decision is meant to offset anticipated revenue losses from regulatory changes that took effect on Friday. Democratic Sen. Dick Durbin of Illinois introduced those changes to last year's Dodd-Frank financial reform legislation. Durbin joins host Audie Cornish to explain why he thinks the legislation is important.

Middle East
5:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Syrian Army Faces Its Own Among Protesters

The Syrian government is continuing its brutal crackdown against protesters. For much of the past week, there have also been clashes between security forces and armed militants in the central town of Rastan and elsewhere. Most of those resisting the government with arms are thought to be defectors from the Syrian army. Host Audie Cornish talks with NPR's Deb Amos from Beirut, where she has been monitoring the Syrian crisis.

Afghanistan
5:00 am
Sun October 2, 2011

Karzai Breaks Off Talks With The Taliban

In a surprising about-face, Afghan President Hamid Karzai appears to be abandoning his government's long-standing effort to hold peace talks with the Taliban in Pakistan, saying they aren't serious about negotiations. NPR's Quil Lawrence reports.

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