Around the Nation
5:30 am
Tue November 6, 2012

N.J. Gov. Christie Chats With 'The Boss'

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. New Jersey Governor Chris Christie finally met his state's favorite son. He attended more than 100 Bruce Springsteen concerts without meeting the devoted Democrat. But after the Republican governor toured storm damage with President Obama, the two embraced. Campaigning with Springsteen, the president later put the two men on the phone, matching the Boss with the governor who once sang Springsteen music in a TV appearance.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "THUNDER ROAD")

Around the Nation
5:20 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Boca Raton's Mayor Wants A Spelling Change

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. When the Florida city of Boca Raton hosted the last presidential debate, even the previous debate's moderator mispronounced it. Outsiders do tend to call it Boca Raton, like baton, possibly because it dropped the E on the end decades ago. Now the mayor wants the E back in the name. She joked to the South Florida Sun Sentinel: We'll put you in jail like Al Capone if you don't say it like Boca Raton. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.

It's All Politics
5:03 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Guide For The Day: An Election Day Timeline

Voters fill out their ballots on the first day of early voting on Oct. 27 in Miami.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

The finish line is in sight as voters make their final decisions on Election Day. Here's a guide to key times of the day across the nation. Stay with NPR throughout the day as we follow the presidential race and key battles that will determine control of the House and Senate.

Join NPR to hear live coverage, which begins at 8 p.m. EST on NPR.org and many member stations.

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It's All Politics
5:01 am
Tue November 6, 2012

The Battle For Congress: Senate And House Races To Watch

Sen. Scott Brown, R-Mass., shakes hands with Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren at their Oct. 1 debate in Lowell, Mass. The race is one of a handful of contests that could determine party control of the Senate.
Charles Krupa AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 5:02 pm

For Republicans itching to regain control of the Senate, Tuesday's election presents a rare opportunity. Only 10 GOP incumbents are on the ballot, compared with nearly two dozen Democrats and independents who caucus with them.

That means the magic number for Republicans is low. They need only a net gain of three or four seats to take over the Senate — and, assuming they keep the U.S. House of Representatives, consolidate their influence on Capitol Hill. Democrats need to pick up 25 seats to seize the House, a goal that political analysts consider all but out of reach.

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It's All Politics
4:58 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Voters To Settle Tight And Turbulent Presidential Battle

Supporters attend a Mitt Romney rally Monday in Columbus, Ohio.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 6:08 am

As Americans go to the polls, one of the closest presidential races in years may be determined by a state in the Midwest and a hurricane named Sandy.

After a campaign that has cost some $6 billion, the two candidates are in the same place they started: with President Obama a smidgen ahead of challenger Mitt Romney, so close that differences are in most cases statistically insignificant.

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It's All Politics
4:58 am
Tue November 6, 2012

GOP Eyes Gains As Voters In 11 States Pick Governors

New Hampshire gubernatorial candidates Democrat Maggie Hassan and Republican Ovide Lamontagne talk before their Oct. 4 debate in Henniker, N.H.
Jim Cole AP

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 7:03 pm

Voters in 11 states will pick their governors tonight, and Republicans appear on track to increase their numbers by at least one, with the potential to extend their hold to more than two-thirds of the nation's top state offices.

Eight of the gubernatorial seats up for grabs are now held by Democrats; three are in Republican hands. Republicans currently hold 29 governorships, Democrats have 20, and Rhode Island's Gov. Lincoln Chafee is an Independent.

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Election 2012
3:56 am
Tue November 6, 2012

House Seats Up For Grabs, Third Of Senate Seats

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The race for president has been at the heart of this election season. Let's turn now to the intense and expensive battle going on for control of the House and the Senate.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The next Congress will be losing some famous names, like Barney Frank, Joe Lieberman and Ron Paul - all retiring. Today, one-third of the Senate and all 435 seats in the House are up for grabs.

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Election 2012
3:51 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Romney Sets Last-Minute Election Day Appearances

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

This is a day that many Americans will spend staring at maps of the United States.

INSKEEP: Some who are not staring already have the electoral map in their heads, as they calculate ways that President Obama or Mitt Romney can win 270 electoral votes.

MONTAGNE: In order to win, President Obama would need to hang on to painfully close leads in several states.

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Around the Nation
3:41 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Sandy Victims Struggle To Find Temporary Housing

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

New York's Mayor Bloomberg has hired a former FEMA official with experience in Hurricane Katrina to direct the city's housing recovery. NPR's Martin Kaste reports it's another sign of the seriousness of the housing shortage caused by the storm.

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Election 2012
3:41 am
Tue November 6, 2012

Why Does The U.S. Hold Elections On Tuesday?

Originally published on Tue November 6, 2012 10:18 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

As voters all over the country mark their ballots today, we revisit a story from NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin, who wondered: Why do Americans vote on Tuesday?

SELENA SIMMONS-DUFFIN, BYLINE: The answer, turns out, is a little obscure. Senate Historian Don Ritchie had to dig through some historical documents so he could explain.

DON RITCHIE: In the early 19th century, basically it was a crazy quilt of elections.

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