Science and Innovation

Don Davis/NASA

Scientists are dismissing a popular theory about mass extinction since the last ice age. The Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis contends an asteroid hit Earth 13,000 years ago changing the climate instantly and dramatically. Scott Anderson, a paleoecologist at Northern Arizona University, is part of an international research team that looked for evidence to support this explanation, but didn't find any.


Steve Hillebrand, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

A disease fatal to deer and elk has struck herds in some western states. But Chronic Wasting Disease hasn’t yet arrived in Arizona, according to the Arizona Game and Fish Department.


Jackie Banks, US Forest Service SW Region, Kaibab National Forest

Scientists want the public’s help to document the biodiversity of the Kaibab National Forest. From the Arizona Science Desk, Melissa Sevigny reports on a new citizen science project.

Getty Images

Bach and Mozart have one. ZZ Top has one. And of course all of The Beatles have them. They are asteroids.


Melissa Sevigny

The Grand Canyon is running short on sand. Sediment that once washed down the Colorado River to form beaches is now trapped behind Glen Canyon Dam. For two decades river managers have released artificial floods to rebuild the beaches … but it’s not clear if the river has enough sand for these experiments to work in the long run. That’s what scientists want to find out.

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