wolf

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Mexican Gray Wolf Recovery Program in eastern Arizona and New Mexico has long been hindered by illegal killings of the endangered animals. A recent study concluded it’s as big a factor in the population’s recovery as genetic diversity and health. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


 

A Utah hunter who killed the first gray wolf seen near the Grand Canyon in seven decades won't face criminal charges because he thought he was shooting a coyote, U.S. Fish and Wildlife announced Thursday.

Arizona Game and Fish Department

Federal wildlife officials have confirmed that an endangered gray wolf mistaken for a coyote and killed by a hunter was the same one recently seen near the Grand Canyon. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, Echo — as the wolf had been unofficially named — was the first of its species known to roam the area near the national park in more than 70 years.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

The Arizona Game and Fish Department this month will begin its annual count of Mexican gray wolves. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the agency anticipates a growth in the population of the endangered animals.

Arizona Game and Fish Department

Officials with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have confirmed that the animal spotted near the North Rim of the Grand Canyon is a gray wolf. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it’s the first of its kind to be seen in the area in more than 70 years.

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