wildfire

USFS

Authorities say some private residences are threatened by a 100-acre fire on unincorporated private land in Clints Well, located south of Flagstaff.

 

Arizona State Forestry officials say the human-caused Reservoir Fire began Monday morning south of the boat ramp at C.C. Cragin Reservoir.

They say several private residences northeast of the reservoir are threatened and two of those were occupied and self-evacuated.

The Moqui Lookout Tower also has been evacuated as a precautionary measure.

Coconino National Forest

Fire crews with the Coconino National Forest had a busy Memorial Day Weekend as they responded to 143 abandoned campfires. They also worked to extinguish other small human-caused blazes.

“Our fire prevention folks were out in full force, full staff over Memorial Day Weekend,” says Coconino National Forest spokesman George Jozens. “All I know is when people are coming to visit the forest, they really need to be responsible with their campfires.”

The U.S. Forest Service has discovered a new, small wildfire burning in Kaibab National Forest.

The Bert Fire has grown to about 50 acres and is located about 10 miles southeast of the community of Valle in Coconino County.

Forestry officials discovered the fire on Sunday and are managing it to reduce the accumulation of dry debris that can cause a more severe fire.

Officials say allowing the fire to burn will also improve wildlife habitat and the overall health of the forest. It's primarily burning in pinion and juniper woodland. Lightning ignited the fire.

The West’s pioneer spirit characterizes not only many of the region’s people, but also some of its plants. And a trio of pioneer species collectively called fire mosses, known on every continent, may prove an excellent tool for repairing burned-over lands on the Colorado Plateau.


Hawaii, Alaska and the Southwest face an above-average threat of wildfires this summer, but most of the country should see normal or below-normal problems, forecasters said Sunday.

The National Interagency Fire Center's outlook for the spring and summer shows the potential for significant fires will be below average for much of Texas, the South and the southern Midwest. But some regions will face active fire seasons.

Here's a look at specific areas with increased danger this season:

HAWAII

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