water

The Center SF

The Army Corps of Engineers has ordered thousands of demonstrators near the Standing Rock Sioux Nation to leave by Monday. They’ve been camped on federal land for months, trying to stop a massive oil pipeline project they believe will contaminate water sources and destroy sacred sites. Most of these “Water Protectors” are members of Native American tribes. And they believe the federal government and the mainstream media don’t understand the true purpose of their mission: that water has deep cultural and spiritual significance to indigenous people. In this audio postcard, we bring you the voices of two Arizonans who went to Standing Rock to protect the water they believe embodies life itself.


Andrew Cullen/Reuters

The president of the Navajo Nation wants the Obama administration to end construction of the 1,200-mile Dakota Access Pipeline. Russell Begaye says the law enforcement response to demonstrators opposed to the project puts the lives of Native Americans at risk. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


USBR

An experimental release of water begins today at Glen Canyon Dam. The artificial flood will rebuild sandbars and improve wildlife habitat on the Colorado River.


AIRPANO.COM

A university research group says the next president will have to act fast to help the Colorado River continue serving millions of city-dwellers, farmers, Indian tribes and recreational users in the U.S. Southwest.

US Bureau of Reclamation

The federal Bureau of Reclamation in early November will again increase flows of Colorado River water through the Grand Canyon.

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