Verde Valley

Farmers in central Arizona are working together to protect a precious resource that flows through their land. The Verde River supplies every drop of water they use for irrigation, and everything else in their lives. As the drought swallows up lakes and rivers across the West, Verde Valley farmers are embracing new and old technology to ensure their water supply doesn’t dry up. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports.

The Verde Valley Archeology Center

A collection of Native American artifacts from an excavation in Cottonwood inspired the creation of the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. As Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that collection has come home to the Verde Valley.

A nearly $3 million grant from the federal government will help restore parts of the Verde River. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the funds will boost a decade-long effort by conservation groups and farmers to increase sustainable water use on the river.

Courtesy photo

The Verde Valley, watered by the Verde River, is named for the ultra-green cast it gives to central Arizona’s desert.

Michael Collier

Montezuma Well is easy to find down in the Verde Valley–it’s located right at the intersection of geology and biology.  The blue-green pool–120 yards wide, cupped in a perfectly round sinkhole–is startling in the middle of a mesquite desert.