Verde Valley

Melissa Sevigny

Arizona’s Verde River has a lot of competing uses: city dwellers, farmers, kayakers and environmentalists all want its water in different ways. But a new project aims to unite everyone over a glass of beer. A farm in Camp Verde has planted a crop of malt barley, to conserve water and give Arizona breweries a key ingredient to craft a truly local beer. KNAU’s Melissa Sevigny reports. 

Cindy Carpien

Part of what protects many ancient archaeological sites from looting and vandalism, is that their locations often aren’t widely known. But social media is changing that, easily publicizing sensitive areas with a tweet of Facebook post. In the Verde Valley, archaeologists are part of a pilot program to test a new monitoring system they hope will safeguard the area’s more than 2,500 known Sinagua and Yavapai-Apache sites. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


The “yuk factor” is definitely there: owls regurgitate little packets of undigested bones, fur, and feathers left over from animals they ate a few hours earlier.


Farmers in central Arizona are working together to protect a precious resource that flows through their land. The Verde River supplies every drop of water they use for irrigation, and everything else in their lives. As the drought swallows up lakes and rivers across the West, Verde Valley farmers are embracing new and old technology to ensure their water supply doesn’t dry up. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports.

The Verde Valley Archeology Center

A collection of Native American artifacts from an excavation in Cottonwood inspired the creation of the Verde Valley Archaeology Center. As Arizona Public Radio’s Melissa Sevigny reports, that collection has come home to the Verde Valley.

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