U.S. Department of the Interior

Josemaria Toscano/Deseret News

Mining industry groups last week asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a ban on new uranium mining claims near the Grand Canyon. KNAU’s Ryan Heinsius reports, the Obama-era order was designed to protect the watershed on more than a million acres.

Katie Walton-Day/U.S. Geological Survey via AP, file

U.S. scientists studying the effects of uranium mining around the Grand Canyon say they are lacking information on whether the radioactive element is hurting plants, animals and a water source for more than 30 million people.

Felicia Fonseca/AP

U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke's plan for a major realignment to put more of his department's decision-makers in the field has a fundamental flaw in the eyes of some who spent their careers making those decisions: They're already out there.

AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File

A year of upheaval at the U.S. Interior Department has seen dozens of senior staff members reassigned and key leadership positions left unfilled, rules considered burdensome to industry shelved, and a sweeping reorganization proposed for its 70,000 employees.


Williams-Grand Canyon News.

From its headquarters in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Bureau of Land Management oversees some of the nation's most prized natural resources: vast expanses of public lands rich in oil, gas, coal, grazing for livestock, habitat for wildlife, hunting ranges, fishing streams and hiking trails.