State Capitol News

AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin

The Republican-controlled Arizona House has scheduled votes on three bills already passed by the Senate that target abortion or abortion providers.

Senate Bill 1324 bars doctors from prescribing a common abortion drug after seven weeks of pregnancy and requires it to be taken only in FDA-approved doses. Most abortions using RU-486 are now done at much lower doses. Courts blocked a similar 2012 law.

Gov. Doug Ducey has signed legislation cutting state shared revenue from municipalities and counties that pass regulations like plastic bag bans that conflict with state law.

The Republican governor's action on Thursday came despite a plea for him to veto the bill from the organization representing all 91 Arizona cities and towns.

The letter the Arizona Cities and Towns sent to Ducey Thursday says Senate Bill 1487 minimizes the important role of local elected officials and calls it heavy-handed and intrusive.

A bill overhauling the state's campaign finance laws that has passed a House panel would also allow politicians to divert campaign contributions to other politicians.

Democratic Rep. Ken Clark says the measure would amount to a fundamental change in state politics that allows politicians to buy votes from colleagues using campaign contributions. Clark calls it the "king maker provision."

Bill sponsor Sen. Adam Driggs added the provision onto a sweeping bill he said is designed to simplify and re-organize the state's campaign finance code.

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UPDATE: According to the U.S. State Department, former State Senator Jack Jackson, Jr. is not running for state senate in Legislative District 7.

So far, only one candidate has officially announced her senate run for the state’s largest legislative district, LD-7. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports.


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The Senate has rejected a measure that would allow parents to let their children opt out of statewide assessments.

Several lawmakers and State Superintendent of Public Instruction Diane Douglas supported the measure as a way for parents to have more control over their children's education. Republican lawmaker Sen. Sylvia Allen of Snowflake sponsored the bill that would allow parents to let their children opt-out of statewide achievement tests such as AzMERIT.

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