Southwest Book Reviews

This fall, the writer Ann Patchett did something radical.  She opened a bookstore.  This goes against the trend. The indie bookstores are practically extinct. I miss Flagstaff’s old landmarks, McGaugh’s Newsstand on Aspen, Aradia Books just across the tracks.  I’m glad we’ve still got Starlight Books on Leroux.

I was thinking, if you want to buy your child a book for Christmas, what are the options?  The big chain bookstores?  I guess.  The internet?  Sure.  Download Where the Wild Things Are and hand your kid a Kindle. 

Writer Sergio Troncoso graduated from Harvard, studied philosophy at Yale, and was a Fulbright Scholar in Mexico.  But he started in a Texas barrio.  In his latest novel, he tells the story of upward mobility in a family much like his own. 

Anthropologies

Oct 12, 2011

When Beth Alvarado was a child in the Fifties, her parents moved to Grand Junction, Colorado at the time, a uranium hotbed. They came with a proud legacy: They were from a line of people who had seized opportunity and done well.

The family roots are pre-Revolutionary War. One grandmother had been a Mormon pioneer, another, a store-bought bride. A gambling grandfather won a handsome family home in Hayward, California. Through the generations, gambling and hard work had paid off. By the 1950's, the family was upper class, propertied and educated.

The Lonely Polygamist

Jun 21, 2011

Angle of Repose

May 17, 2011

Flagstaff, AZ – In 1932, Eleanor Roosevelt was working hard to get Franklin elected president. She was hoping for an early endorsement from Arizona. She wrote her friend Isabella Greenway, who was on the verge of being elected Arizona's first congresswoman. But Isabella advised soft-pedaling. Her instincts were sound. FDR carried Arizona, but the delegates emerged from community efforts not a hard push from the national organization.

Flood Song

Feb 25, 2011

Cheyenne Madonna

Jan 20, 2011

Occasionally a short story writer comes along whose stories are as roomy and absorbing as good novels. Eddie Chuculate is such a writer. In each of the seven stories in his wonderful premier book, "Cheyenne Madonna," Chuculate treats us to seductive, ornery, winsome characters muddling along in the messy business of living.

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