southwest

George Andrejko, AGFD

If you’re by a desert spring in far northwest Arizona or southeast Nevada and hear a low chuckle followed by what sounds like fingers rubbing on a balloon, you may have stumbled upon a relict leopard frog.


Scott Thybony

If you’ve done any exploring around the Southwest, you’ve probably visited a few places with rather ominous names: “Bloody Basin,” “Skull Valley,” “The Superstition Mountains.” Seems Arizona is full of places named after grim legends. “Deadman Flat” is no exception. It’s a place writer Scott Thybony has visited many times. In his latest Canyon Commentary, Thybony tells the tale of how “Deadman Flat” got its name. 


Earth Notes: Vermilion Flycatchers

Feb 8, 2017
Dyer Lytle

In late February and early March, brilliant red and charcoal male vermilion flycatchers, like valentines on wings, arrive on their breeding grounds along Arizona’s rivers.  


Earth Notes: Controlling Kochia in the West

Feb 1, 2017
Scott Abella

In dry, disturbed soil throughout the West, a weedy invader from Eurasia has gained a tenacious foothold. Kochia scoparia, also called poor man’s alfalfa, has slender, gray-green leaves that turn an ornamental orange in autumn. Despite control efforts, this weed springs back relentlessly thanks to its bountiful seed bank.


U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Collection

Writer Wallace Stegner once claimed that exploration of the West by European-Americans began with Lewis and Clark and ended with Almon Thompson.


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