southwest

New Mexico History Museum

In 1846, U.S. soldiers swept down the Santa Fe trail to seize the province of New Mexico for the United States. Santa Fe was then part of Mexico, and for a time during this war soldiers camped in the roomy courtyard at the city’s Palace of the Governors. One soldier wrote an evocative description that includes mention of baking ovens there.


Earth Notes: Plant Galls

Feb 14, 2018
Gary Alpert

Lots of plants bear strange-looking swellings on their leaves and stems. These wart-like growths are called galls, and they’re the direct result of mites and insects injecting chemicals into the plant’s tissue during rapid cell division.


Earth Notes: Tough Dirt

Feb 7, 2018
Jim Harrigan, NRCS

The Colorado Plateau is a land of constant discovery—both above and beneath our feet. Recently a surprising soil was unearthed that fit a previously empty slot in the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s established soil classification system. 

Williams-Grand Canyon News.

From its headquarters in Washington, D.C., the U.S. Bureau of Land Management oversees some of the nation's most prized natural resources: vast expanses of public lands rich in oil, gas, coal, grazing for livestock, habitat for wildlife, hunting ranges, fishing streams and hiking trails.

Scott Thybony

This winter is one of the driest on record, but the winter of 1877 was another story. Freezing temperatures and heavy snowfall were documented in the journal of Lucy Flake, a pioneer woman traveling by covered wagon from Utah to Arizona with her young family. At Black Falls, near what is now Wupatki National Monument, Lucy described the hardships and anguish of the group. Commentator Scott Thybony recently hiked that same dry river bed and remembered Lucy’s suffering. 


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