Senator John McCain

Associated Press

Donald Trump is doubling down on his controversial comments aimed at Arizona Senator John McCain. As Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports, Trump not only questioned McCain’s status as a war hero, he’s now attacking the senator’s record on veteran’s issues.

Over the weekend, the republican presidential candidate said he likes soldiers who are not captured, instead of POWs like McCain, who spent more than five years as a prisoner of war in Vietnam. On Monday's NBC’s Today, Trump clarified his comments, and says he has no problem calling McCain a war hero.

  A Republican Arizona lawmaker who has been exploring a challenge to longtime U.S. Sen. John McCain is set to reveal her decision at a Lake Havasu City news conference.

State Sen. Kelli Ward announced in April she was considering taking on the five-term incumbent in next year's Republican primary. She's scheduled a news conference Tuesday afternoon to announce her decision.

McCain announced in April that he'll seek to extend his nearly three-decade career in the Senate by running for a sixth term.

Jennifer Johnson

Earlier this week, the supervisor of the Tonto National Forest met with a group of Native Americans hoping to prevent copper mining at a sacred site east of Phoenix. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, recent federal legislation cleared the way for the Oak Flat area to become part of North America’s largest copper mine.

The Environmental Protection Agency is revising the Clean Water Act to clarify which waters are protected. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, both of Arizona’s U.S. senators see the agency’s move as an expansion of federal environmental regulation that could harm the state’s economy.

Today Arizona’s two Republican senators helped their party block the Paycheck Fairness Act, which would have given women new tools to combat pay discrimination in the workforce.

Shelley Smithson

Protesters held up signs and booed as Arizona  Senators Jon Kyl and John McCain visited Tuba City Thursday.

The senators were in Tuba City to discuss details of their water settlement bill with Navajo and Hopi officials.  

The $300 million bill would cede the tribe’s claims to the Little Colorado River in exchange for three water development projects in reservation communities where many lack running water.

But the bill is unpopular with many, even those who live in communities that would get drinking water.