Scott Thybony Commentaries

The Grand Canyon is - without a doubt - a visually stunning place. But, there's more to that beauty than what can be seen with the human eye. That's something commentator Scott Thybony has learned on his backcountry adventures below the Canyon's rim.

Sorting out fact from fiction can be difficult sometimes, depending on the nature of the story. For commentator Scott Thybony, that was certainly the case with an old manuscript from the late 1800's. In his latest Grand Canyon Commentary, Thybony tells us about a story involving a trader on the Colorado River, a doomed romance and a cursed blanket...he's still not sure what to make of it.

Shane McDermott

Commentator Scott Thybony left today on a trip to Cape Solitude, on the rim of the Grand Canyon. Before he left, he shared some of his thoughts on the significance of the river junction Cape Solitude overlooks. Deep in the canyon below, The Colorado and Little Colorado join together at a place known to many as The Confluence.  

Peering over the edge of the Grand Canyon for the first time can be a sublime experience. The awe-inspiring beauty can overwhelm and take over your senses. But, as commentator Scott Thybony says, not all first-timers are able to go "into the view" of the Grand Canyon. Instead, they remain on the outside looking in.

National Park Service

The south rim of the Grand Canyon is home to several structural masterpieces designed by  visionary architect Mary Colter in the early 1900's. In his latest Grand Canyon Commentary, Scott Thybony brings us the story of a forgotten staircase leading to one of Colter's favorite spots along the canyon's rim.