scott thybony

Scott Thybony

"Death by quicksand" has become a cliché in Hollywood Westerns set in Arizona. But in reality, it's practically unheard of. One of the state's only known quicksand deaths happened in 1872 in Paria Canyon. About 130 years later - in the exact same place - commentator Scott Thybony almost became Arizona's second quicksand fatality.

Scott Thybony

Hull Cabin is the oldest remaining cabin in the Grand Canyon region of the Kaibab National Forest. It was built 125 years ago by brothers William and Philip Hull - early ranchers, prospectors and guiding entrepreneurs. It's near the remnants of another cabin which belonged to John Hance, the first resident of the South Rim. And as commentator Scott Thybony says, between the sublime views and the deep solitude, it's not hard to see why these early pioneers set up shop where they did.


Before becoming a national park, the remote western part of the Grand Canyon was a place where a handful of ranchers - with true grit - struggled to earn a living. To make things a little more comfortable, they opened a winter camp deep within the canyon. It was known as "The Hotel" and remains an occasional refuge for hikers. In his latest Grand Canyon Commentary, Scott Thybony tells us about the night he spent at "The Hotel"

Northern Arizona is full of river runners, many of whom take their dogs downriver with them. Whether it's the Verde or the Salt River, many a mutt has gone along for the ride. And though dogs aren't allowed on the Colorado River in the Grand Canyon, commentator Scott Thybony says that doesn't mean it hasn't been done.

Scott Thybony

Writer Scott Thybony loves a good mystery, especially when it involves the Grand Canyon. In his latest commentary, Thybony shares the story of how a missing canteen might be connected to a missing cowboy.

Rules of thumb come in handy at times.  Commentator Scott Thybony has learned a few of them over the years from Grand Canyon guides, scientists, and rangers.