Science and Technology

Brain Food: It's A Microbial World Afterall

Nov 7, 2013
Monica Saaty / IDEA Lab

Bacteria make up most of life on Earth. It's life we can't see. Some bacteria thrive in such extreme environments as the boiling water of the hot springs in Yellowstone National Park, or in the driest place on Earth - the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. But, according to Greg Caporaso in the Center of Microbial Genetics and Genomics at NAU, the most extreme environment for life is inside the human body.

Carol Chambers

Slogging through the thick, sticky mud of a pond in Sedona, wildlife biologist Carol Chambers is catching bats in nets stretched across the water.


The monsoon season has arrived in full force. This week has brought some powerful storms to the region. Arizona Public Radio's Gillian Ferris spoke with meteorologist Lee Born about this summer's rainfall.

KNAU/Janice Baker

Bike wheels are turning on the campus of Northern Arizona University, but not just for exercise. The eco-pedaler uses human power to charge portable electronics. Arizona Public Radio's Janice Baker reports.

Flu hits Arizona hard

Jan 10, 2013
CDC/ Douglas Jordan, M.A.

Right on the heels of the holiday season, it’s time for the flu season.

2012 The Warmest Year On Record

Jan 9, 2013

Last year was the hottest year on record for the contiguous United States. And the Upper Colorado River Basin had its driest year on record, according to the latest National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration climate report released Tuesday.

Now, it’s time for a gut check. Literally.  A researcher at Northern Arizona University is working with a team of scientists trying to unravel what lives inside our guts.

Shelley Smithson

It’s a cold morning in Flagstaff and the sun is still low in the winter sky.

Business partners Ryan Holtz and Jim Corning have positioned a photovoltaic panel to face southeast.

When they plug it in, a digital monitor starts measuring the amount of energy being produced by the sun.

“Wow. 159 watts, 160, cool,” says Jim Corning, a partner in Plug and Play Solar Kits of Arizona. “Now, we’re out from behind the cloud a little more. 178. Part of the fun is messing around with these things and getting them pointed right and seeing the output.”

NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS, Sept. 7, 2012, PDT

Later this year, the Mars Rover Curiosity is scheduled to begin its longest road trip yet, to Mount Sharp.  That’s a three-mile-high mountain on Mars that tells the planet’s geologic history in the same way the Grand Canyon’s exposes earth’s.  But getting Curiosity to its ultimate destination depends on maps and cameras.  That’s where Flagstaff’s office of the U.S. Geological Survey comes in.

4FRI Part 4: What Restoration Will Look and Smell Like

Nov 16, 2012
Michael Collier

Over the past several days, writers Rose Houk and Michael Collier have been reporting on the plight of our ponderosa pine forest and efforts to restore its health. In this final installment, we look at industry’s role, and what the public can expect to see when restoration gets underway.