Science and Technology

Arthur Gonzales/iNaturalist

Citizen Science Projects involve a lot of data recording, and you don’t necessarily expect to find anything startling or new. But Forest Service ranger Arthur Gonzales did when he was on a hike with his family near Williams. He was taking photos for a public project on the Kaibab National Forest to document plants and animals when he came across a rare beetle. 


Earth Notes: Honeypot Ants

Aug 30, 2017
Gary Alpert

Feast or famine is the watchword in the Colorado Plateau’s unpredictable climate. To survive lean times, honeypot ants, common in the region, have devised a unique strategy.  


Jesse Barber

Many insects and spiders rely on sounds and vibrations to find food, meet mates and detect predators. So it’s likely they’d be sensitive to the roar of heavy machinery. 


Melissa Sevigny

Today’s full solar eclipse was the first in 100 years to stretch from coast to coast in the U.S. Millions of people flocked to the 70-mile-wide path of totality, and one of them is KNAU’s science reporter Melissa Sevigny. She’s on the line with me from Madras, Ore., which was in the center of the path of totality.


Earth Notes: Quiet Parks

Aug 16, 2017
National Park Service

Bugling elk, rolling thunder, the delicate trill of a hummingbird’s wings. These natural sounds can be heard in America’s national parks—some of the quietest places on Earth. 


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