Science and Technology

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

More than 170 different kinds of bees are pollinating plants in Arizona’s high elevation forests. Flagstaff ecologist Lindsie McCabe wants to know what will happen to them as global temperatures warm. She’s conducting experiments with bees on the San Francisco Peaks, simulating the impact of climate change on native pollinators.


Justin Regan

Off the top of your head, can you name the four spheres of Earth? If it’s not coming to you easily, a group of Flagstaff 5th graders can help. The students at Killip Elementary School are studying Earth’s biosphere, geosphere, atmosphere and hydrosphere. Its’ part of a special STEM program to help kids apply real world observations to their school work. On a recent trip to Lake Mary, they worked with scientists and field experts to see Earth’s spheres in action. Arizona Public Radio’s Justin Regan has this audio postcard. 


Emergency fire shelters used by wildland firefighters may soon become more effective by using NASA technology. Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports they’ll be made with similar heat-resistant materials used to enter the Martian atmosphere.


Courtesy of thetreecenter.com

Voracious Japanese beetles are becoming frequent fliers on airlines traveling from the East Coast to the West Coast. And that’s wreaking havoc on hundreds of species of plants. Ecosystem scientist Bruce Hungate is trying to find out how the beetles are getting their boarding passes. 


Dan Ruby, University of Nevada, Reno

Rollie-polies, book lice and bugs called springtails are among the 10 newly discovered insects that live only on the remote Easter Island in the Pacific Ocean. Northern Arizona University Ecologist Jut Wynne and his colleagues found eight of these creatures. They're eking out an existence in the limited entrances and skylights of caves.


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