Science

Source: Chris Carroll

Arizona residents heard a boom and saw a flash of light in the sky early in the morning, prompting speculation that a meteor was the source.

Media reports say the boom and flash were noticed shortly before 4 a.m. There were no immediate reports of damage.

The Arizona Geological Survey's seismic network didn't pick up any impacts.

Michael Conway of the survey says that could mean the meteor broke up in the sky and that the impacts of any remnants were too small to be recorded.

Courtesy

A fungus that’s been around for more than 400 million years is showing up in the roots of trees and grasses all over the world and helping plants grow. In a global study, Northern Arizona University Ecologist Nancy Johnson contributed samples of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the Serengeti. She says the findings are surprising.


Shelley Smithson

It’s a cold morning in Flagstaff and the sun is still low in the winter sky.

Business partners Ryan Holtz and Jim Corning have positioned a photovoltaic panel to face southeast.

When they plug it in, a digital monitor starts measuring the amount of energy being produced by the sun.

“Wow. 159 watts, 160, cool,” says Jim Corning, a partner in Plug and Play Solar Kits of Arizona. “Now, we’re out from behind the cloud a little more. 178. Part of the fun is messing around with these things and getting them pointed right and seeing the output.”