renewable energy

Melissa Sevigny

Forests in northern Arizona have a problem: massive piles of wood chips left behind from thinning projects. They can’t stay in the forest because of the fire danger and there’s no local market for them. But they have to go somewhere. A new experiment is testing the idea of burning them along with coal to generate electricity. It’s not easy to do, but if contractors can sell wood chips to power plants, that could speed up forest restoration.


A member of the state's utility regulation panel says he wants Arizona electric utilities to nearly double the amount of power they get from renewable resources.

Salt River Project

Arizona’s first attempt to generate electricity with a mix of biomass and coal will take place later this year, using debris from forest thinning projects in northern Arizona.


In 2015 the EPA issued a Clean Power Plan directing states to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power plants. Under the plan, for example, Arizona will need to cut annual carbon emissions from 40 to 30 million tons by 2030.


Melissa Sevigny

Arizona ranks third in the nation for small-scale solar installations, according to new data from the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

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