public health

Melissa Sevigny

Some doctors are operating on hands in a new way: with the patient wide awake. It eliminates the risks and side effects of general anesthesia. But the technique has been slow to catch on in the United States because of a decades-old myth about the dangers of injecting adrenaline into hands. From the Arizona Science Desk, Melissa Sevigny reports on how that’s starting to change.


Melissa Sevigny

There’s a map on the wall of the Cameron community center on the Navajo Nation with nearly one hundred red dots scattered all over it. They mark abandoned uranium mines. More than 500 of these mines exist on the reservation. They’re linked to cancer and other potentially deadly illnesses. But nobody knows the extent of the emotional trauma of living on land that’s contaminated. That’s the focus of a new project to raise awareness and bring healing through art.

CDC / Cade Martin

An infection normally found in hospitals might also be spread to humans by their dogs. That’s the finding of a Northern Arizona University team that collected canine fecal samples from all over Flagstaff.


serc.carleton.edu

There are more than 500 abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation and only a handful have ever been cleaned up. Now, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has begun the long-term process to make the most dangerous of those mines safe for the environment and public health. Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports. 


David Dorward, PhD / National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease

Tens of thousands of patients die every year from infections they pick up while they’re in the hospital. A Flagstaff-based institute has developed a screening test to find these infections early, before symptoms appear.


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