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A recent study ranked Arizona as the strictest state in the nation for drunk-driving enforcement. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it has the longest minimum jail sentence for first-time offenders.

 

Police chiefs across the state are applauding Governor Doug Ducey for vetoing Senate Bill 1445. The proposal would have shielded the names of officers involved in shootings for 60 days. As Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports, Sedona’s Police Chief was one of the bill’s outspoken critics.

Gov. Doug Ducey vetoed legislation Monday requiring law enforcement agencies to keep the names of officers involved in shootings secret for two months, nixing a bill that was inspired by last year's events Ferguson, Missouri, and similar incidents around the country.

Tucson Police’s Sweep of Cell Phone Data Challenged

Sep 1, 2014
Glenn Chapman/AFP/Getty Images

A lawsuit playing out in Tucson could determine how much people get to know about how police in the state use devices to track cell-phone users. Arizona Public Radio’s Howard Fischer explains.

blogs.reuters.com. Photo by Vincent Wes

In recent years, heroin use has skyrocketed in the U.S. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, after three deaths last month in Flagstaff that police suspect resulted from overdoses, use of and access to the drug seems to have also spiked in northern Arizona.

The Navajo Division of Public Safety is in danger of losing $ 35 million in federal funding.

The Navajo Times newspaper reports it has obtained a letter from the Bureau of Indian Affairs to President Ben Shelly outlining the federal agency’s concerns.

The letter cites a recent Navajo Times investigation of Public Safety Director John Billison.

The newspaper reported that a protection order was issued against Billison in Phoenix in 2004 after a woman claimed he had repeatedly assaulted her.