Navajo

Althea John / Navajo Times

Navajo spiritual tradition accepts old age as a natural part of life, but that’s doesn’t mean aging is easy – especially when language and culture can make it difficult to communicate with doctors.


To avoid the first frost, Navajo herders move their livestock to lower ground when aspen trees drop their leaves. Others watch the stars and the moon to gauge the timing of seasonal movements. But with changing climate in the Southwest, nature’s signs have become less reliable.


Russell Begaye easily beat a former Navajo Nation president Tuesday for the top post on the country's largest American Indian reservation.

Barbara Davidson/Los Angeles Times

In early July, Democratic Representative Ann Kirkpatrick of Arizona’s First Congressional District introduced a bill designed to spur economic development on the Navajo Nation. As Arizona Public Radio’s Ryan Heinsius reports, it would affect some of the reservation’s poorest areas.

George Hardeen

 

Turning on the lights or opening the fridge are things many of us take for granted. But if you’ve never had electricity, they might seem like luxuries. Now, for dozens of families on the Navajo Nation, those luxuries are becoming a reality. As Arizona Public Radio’s Aaron Granillo reports, more than 60 families will soon have electricity for the first time in their lives.

Margie Tso has a beautiful view from her family ranch on the Navajo Nation, just southeast of Page.

“I have been living out here since 1952,” said Tso.

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