NAU

KNAU/Bonnie Stevens

Flagstaff has long been a training destination for world class athletes. The high altitude makes their bodies produce more red blood cells and absorb more oxygen, which in turn builds their endurance and speed. Canadian exercise physiologist Trent Stellingwerff wants to know what else happens when elite athletes train at 7,000 feet. 


NPS/B. Sutton

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the second installment of the series, we hear about how Wupatki's population survived there a thousand years ago despite the area's extreme arid environment.

The region around Wupatki National Monument on the San Francisco Plateau is so dry it was called the Sierra Sin Agua, or “Mountains Without Water,” by early Spanish explorers. Yet from the 11th to 13th centuries this region supported a population of between several hundred and 2,000 people. How did they do it?


Adam Block, Mt. Lemmon SkyCenter, UA

Three Flagstaff astronomers are part of a team that’s found a giant planet orbiting a surprisingly young star. Before this discovery, scientists believed big planets could only form around old stars.


Alexander Gardner, DeGolyer Library, Southern Methodist University, 1868

The Grand Canyon, Wupatki National Monument and Sunset Crater Volcano are some of the geologic and cultural gems of the National Park Service. This summer, KNAU's Earth Notes series will highlight these, and other special places across the Southwest in honor of the Park Service's 100th anniversary. In the first installment of the series, we hear about efforts to protect sandstone panels of petroglyphs and pictographs at El Morro National Monument in New Mexico.

In west-central New Mexico, a huge sandstone monolith looms above a perennial pool of fresh water that’s sustained thirsty travelers for centuries.


The West’s pioneer spirit characterizes not only many of the region’s people, but also some of its plants. And a trio of pioneer species collectively called fire mosses, known on every continent, may prove an excellent tool for repairing burned-over lands on the Colorado Plateau.


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